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Wednesday, March 29
 

8:00am

Registration / Coffee
Wednesday March 29, 2017 8:00am - 8:50am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

8:50am

Opening Remarks
Welcome remarks from the PDA 2017 Planning Committee.

Wednesday March 29, 2017 8:50am - 9:00am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

9:00am

Keynote 1: Gary Wolf
Quantified Self Archives

Introduction by Henry Lowood, Curator for History of Science & Technology Collections and Film & Media Collections in the Stanford University Libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Gary Wolf

Gary Wolf

Director, Quantified Self
Gary Wolf is the co-founder of The Quantified Self an international collaboration among makers and users of self-tracking tools who share an interest in supporting new discoveries grounded in accurate observation. He is a visiting professor at Hanze University of Applied Technology in Holland and a contributing editor at Wired magazine.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

9:45am

Session 1: Research Horizons
Whose Life Is It, Anyway? Photos, Algorithms, and Memory (Nancy Van House, UC Berkeley)

Digital Workflow and Archiving in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Smiljana Antonijevic Ubois, Penn State University)

Mementos Mori: Saving the Legacy of Older Performers (Joan Jeffri, Research Center for Arts & Culture/The Actors Fund)

Exploring Personal Financial Information Management Among Young Adults (Robert Douglas Ferguson, McGill School of Information Studies

Presentation Details: 

  • Whose Life Is It, Anyway? Photos, Algorithms, and Memory (Nancy Van House, UC Berkeley).

    Photographs and, most recently, videos are key components of many personal archives. They are implicated in performance of identity and in the narratives that we construct about ourselves, individually and collectively. Images (including video with audio) are especially powerful memory objects.  They are typified by excess referentiality, that is, they reveal more than the maker intends; and with repeated viewing they reveal more and more.  Furthermore, as sensory objects they carry considerable emotional weight.

    Viewing, retrieving, organizing, preserving, and sharing the current deluge of digital image files is problematic due to, among other things, their volume, varying file formats, dearth of textual annotations, and dispersal across individual and shared storage sites and technologies.

    In addition to or even instead of local archives, people increasingly rely on shared repositories like Google Images or Flickr.com in which algorithms often used to label, retrieve, and prioritize (“best,” “most interesting,” “most relevant”) images. Popular services like Google Photos, Apple Photos, Flickr, and Adobe Lightroom are now bringing machine learning (especially facial recognition) to consumers’ own collections. While useful, algorithmically-derived metadata can be highly problematic. Images lose the meaning derived from contexts, groupings, sequencing, and the situated practices of making and use.  Descriptors are flattened into a pre-chosen “universal” vocabulary.  The specific is replaced by the general.

    The content and structure of archives shape what we remember, and so these disembodied, decontextualized, “impersonal” tools threaten to torque our memories. These supposedly-impersonal algorithms are rooted, not only in specific practices and histories, but assumptions, values, and power relations.    In this paper, I discuss how, by relying on uninterrogated algorithms, we are unknowingly delegating the work of maintaining critical resources for individual and collective memory, and thus identity. 

  • Digital Workflow and Archiving in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Smiljana Antonijevic Ubois, Penn State University)

    This paper presents findings of a Mellon foundation funded study conducted at the Pennsylvania State University from 2014-2016. Through observations, contextual inquiry sessions, and interviews the study examined how scholars across disciplines engage with digital tools and resources in their research workflows. This paper focuses on digital workflows of scholars in the humanities and social sciences, and highlights diverse approaches to personal archiving, including those that bridge paper-based and digital collections of scholarly materials.

    The results showed that humanists and social scientists increasingly use digital technologies to collect empirical data and other primary sources. In the social sciences, scholars regularly use online surveys, Skype interviewing, digital audio-video recording, and smartphones to collect their data. In the humanities, digital technologies have become indispensable for collecting materials in physical archives where humanists take photos of materials by using their cell-phone cameras, and store those materials for further use. Two main ways of storing data include computer hard drives and cloud-based services like Dropbox.

    The engagement with digital technologies has had positive effects on scholars’ workflow, enabling them to create their personal digital archives of primary sources and to keep those materials at hand for further analysis, making their research much more portable. Yet it also brought significant challenges in managing and archiving those digital materials. Humanists commonly return from the archive with an overload of digital photos that require a lot of storage space, which are not searchable, and for which they often cannot recall the contextual meaning. In the social sciences, problems are commonly related to data privacy and ethics in handling sensitive fieldwork materials.

    This paper reports about the strategies that scholars use to address those challenges, and provides a set of recommendations for academic institutions in supporting digital scholarly workflow and archiving in the humanities and social sciences.

  • Mementos Mori: Saving the Legacy of Older Performers (Joan Jeffri, Research Center for Arts & Culture/The Actors Fund)

    The Research Center for Arts and Culture’s PERFORMING ARTS LEGACY PROJECT (PAL) grows out of seminal research on older professional performing artists age 62+ in LA and NYC (STILL KICKING, 2011) conducted at Columbia University and using a rigorous methodology (Respondent-driven sampling) adapted from the social sciences to identify “hidden” populations. (http://artsandcultureresearch.org/portfolio/still-kicking/)  Its findings informed the creation of an interdisciplinary, intergenerational two-year LEGACY LAB with ten professional actors (67-92), young performers conducting oral histories with them, and graduate students from theatre, education, health and aging  who, with the actors, create a visual mapping of the actors’ careers and curated life reviews.

    The actors’ backgrounds range from classical, Broadway to off-off Broadway and performance art. The RCAC, now at The Actors Fund, works closely with universities, the NY Public Library, performers' unions, and community agencies. The RCAC is creating a web platform open to actors around the world to document their careers and save our national legacy. Its core elements are oral history, database documentation, and life review. In the second year, student interns will create a manual for clearing legal rights, a curriculum guide, and a user guide.  PAL also grew from an earlier project with older professional visual artists, ART CART: SAVING THE LEGACY, also based on original research (ABOVE GROUND, 2007 http://artsandcultureresearch.org/portfolio/above-ground/ ). While visual artists are about their objects which their stories reinforce, older performers are about their stories reinforced by their objects, and we have learned much in three iterations of ART CART to apply to PAL. We propose to present the interplay between research and practice, a discussion that includes aesthetics, control over the material of one’s life stories, as well as the health promotion and positive aging aspects of such digital representation. 

  • Exploring Personal Financial Information Management Among Young Adults (Robert Douglas Ferguson, McGill School of Information Studies

    Financial records are a key category in the collections of personal information of many people. From online shopping to day-to-day banking, an increasing proportion of financial-related records, such as receipts, bills, income tax returns, and budgets will be created, accessed, used, and preserved in digital formats. As a result, people will need to adjust their personal information management (PIM) and personal archiving strategies to account for the progressive and pervasive digitization of personal finance in everyday life.

    What is the impact of the digitization of personal finance on the short and long term use and preservation of personal financial information? How do the behaviors of young adults, as digital natives, compare to those of older age groups, which have already been studied by PIM researchers?

    This presentation reports on 23 guided tour interviews conducted with young adults between the ages of 18 to 25 in Montréal, Québec, Canada. During the guided tours, participants exhibited and discussed their financial PIM and PDA with the researcher. Interviews revealed ways in which young adults progressively rely upon the online portals offered by financial service providers to make available and preserve their personal financial information. Participants also described how information items within personal collections of financial information are used to establish mental models of financial resources, which in turn shape some of their financial behaviors.

    From a theoretical perspective, at present there are two competing models of PIM: Jones and Teevan’s (2007) consumption model and Whittaker’s (2011) curation model. Although significant overlap exists between these two models in terms of personal information management as a process, these models differ in how they define the central problems PIM research aims to resolve. The study of personal collections of financial information of young adults offers a vantage point from which to evaluate current conceptual models of personal information management and inform future research in PIM and PDA more b…

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Smiljana Antonijevic

Smiljana Antonijevic

Research Anthropologist, Penn State University
Smiljana Antonijević Ubois, PhD, explores the intersection of communication, culture, and technology through research and teaching in the U.S. and Europe. She is currently engaged as a chief research anthropologist at Ethnographio Research and at the Pennsylvania State University. Smiljana's most recent book is "Amongst Digital Humanists: An Ethnographic Study of Digital Knowledge Production" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).
RD

Robert Douglas Ferguson

McGill University, Canada
NV

Nancy Van House

Professor Emerita, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley
Nancy A. Van House is Professor Emerita in the School of Information, University of California, Berkeley.  Her research is concerned with visual narrative, memory, and the intersection between personal photographic practices and technologies and social media.   Recent publications include  “Photographic Wayfaring, Now and to Come,” in A. Lehmuskallio & E. Gómez-Cruz (Eds.), Digital Photography and Everyday Life. Empirical studies on... Read More →
avatar for Joan Jeffri

Joan Jeffri

Director and Founder, Research Center for Arts & Culture/The Actors Fund
Joan Jeffri is Founder and Director of the Research Center for Arts and Culture housed first at Columbia University, now at The Actors Fund. Former Director of the Program in Arts Administration at Columbia, she is past President of the Association of Arts Administration Educators and the International Arts Medicine Association. She is a Scholar-in-Residence in the Arts Management Program at American University and honorary professor at... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 9:45am - 11:00am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

11:00am

Break
Enjoy coffee and light pastries while you view demonstrations and posters. 

Wednesday March 29, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

11:00am

Posters 1
  • From Scrapbooks to Apps: Lifelogging Data and its Place in Personal Archiving (Leanna Barcelona).

    Lifelogging, the practice of tracking personal data generated by our behaviors and movements, has become increasingly popular with the development of technology. Devices, websites, and apps allow individuals to track their daily lives in an innovative way. While scrapbooking is not a lost art, people are progressively using technology to create an archive of their personal memories. This poster looks at the use of two different types of lifelogging technologies, FitBit and Exist, and analyzes the benefits and drawbacks they exhibit. It will also explore the future lifelogging data has within the personal archiving world. Future generations may look to this data to better understand today’s populations. Rather than opening your great-grandmother’s scrapbook, you may be opening an excel file of data explaining every step she ever took. With the growth in lifelogging and the Quantified Self Movement, it is important for professionals and researchers to understand how this will affect a historically paper-dominant field. Through this poster, I hope to establish a better understanding of how technology is changing current practices in personal archiving and its usage by others.
     
  • Making Data Management Manageable: A Risk Analysis Activity for Managing Research Data (Elise Dunham, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    Funders, libraries, and journals are emphasizing the importance of research data management to sound academic research. Many hear about the challenges associated with haphazard data management, which are, at their core, personal information management challenges, and some already face these challenges themselves. Even though many researchers fundamentally understand that practices like naming files consistently, backing up hard drives, and writing documentation about research processes are crucial to the success of their work, they tend to consider the task of data management to be daunting and all-too time-consuming. Seeing a need from local researchers for implementable solutions to managing research data, the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing practical data management exercises that are of use to all campus researchers. One outcome of these efforts is a risk analysis activity that encourages researchers to think about the risks associated with unmanaged data. The goal of this activity is for researchers to feel empowered to prioritize their data management activities and motivated to tackle data management in focused phases. In this poster, I introduce the risk analysis activity, demonstrating risk management concepts and highlighting its applicability to other managing other types of information management. The goal of this poster is to inspire those working across a variety of domains to put risk analysis concepts to work in other types of personal information management efforts. As the amount of personal information increases at seemingly insurmountable rates, the need for practical, easy-to-digest methods to prioritize time, money, and energy when managing personal information will remain.

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow) [CANCELED]

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. The Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge).

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  • Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, Ashoka University).

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. This poster will present the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

Speakers
avatar for Leanna Barcelona

Leanna Barcelona

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois
Leanna Barcelona is a current graduate student at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is working towards certification in Special Collections and intends to graduate in May 2017. Leanna has worked at the University Archives for over two years, starting as a student assistant while completing her undergraduate work and then becoming a graduate assistant while completing her masters. In her role at... Read More →
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Elise Dunham

Elise Dunham

Data Curation Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist at the University of Illinois, integrally involved with the launch of the Illinois Data Bank. Dunham has a background in archives and a current focus on privacy, sensitive data, and appraisal in the context of research data.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

11:00am

Posters 2
  • Women’s March on Washington Archives Project (Katrina Vandeven)

    This poster presents the methods by which the Women’s March on Washington Archives Project collected and preserved materials and oral histories from the Women’s Marches on January 21st, 2017. It will particularly highlight the methods by which a large scale oral history collection was implemented nationwide and globally within one month, the triumphs and failures of the project, and the author’s reflection of the project’s creation and implementation.

    Author: Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate University of Denver, Co-Founder Women's March on Washington Archives Project. Collaborator: Danielle Russell, Archives Assistant at the Southern Maryland Studies Center, Co-Founder of Women's March on Washington Archives Project.

  • Photos Die Podcast (Todd Wemer, Endicott College). 

    In my recent dissertation, which theoretically explores personal photography, memory, and concepts of the archive, I included an online audio component, in the form of a voicemail number that people could call to tell stories about lost and/or found photographs. These little audio gems in many ways have become the most important “results” of my completed dissertation (May 2016). Over the course of my fall sabbatical (2016) I’ve been recording audio stories, interviewing people, re-interviewing research subjects, planning a sound rich podcast based on many of the themes I covered in my dissertation.

    Photos Die will be a narrative driven podcast based on the stories we tell about photographs and the photographs we use to tell our stories. The end result I hope to be equally pleasing to a listener of story driven podcasts, as well as scholars interested in personal archives.

  • Preserving precious emails - citizen archive (Anssi Jääskeläinen)

    Inside “secure” shoe boxes at the attic, written on floppy disks or scratched CD-ROMs, laying on the hard drive. This is how old family archives have been made.  To make things more difficult, during the past few decades the playground of the archival masters has grown to include e-mails, online communities and social media as well, in other words, family archives are distributed. When the archival masters are passing away, many of these precious archives are doomed, not necessarily due to ignorance, but due to obsolescence. Naturally there are lots of other reasons, but this paper focuses on how to manage the obsolescence in the case of e-mails.

    The national archives have their preferred and acceptable formats for preserving e-mails. However, these formats such as .pst are software dependent and therefore not easily viewable on other devices or products. Further on, the fonts, image placements, etc. aspects of the e-mail might change between e-mail viewers and this is not acceptable for archival content. Thirdly, does an average citizen know what to do with a file that for example ends with .ost? Finally, there are ways to save e-mails directly into an archival format. However, it is principally wrong to obligate the ordinary citizen to handle this task.

    The presented solution is a fully automated conversion from a proprietary e-mail format (Outlook .pst or .ost) into validated PDF/A-3b files which includes every metadata field that the original e-mail item had. Our approach of handling email data files is fully based on utilizing existing open source products which are bound together with the combination of Python and Java. We have implemented some steps in the workflow in order to get the data conversion completely processed. When integrated with the citizen archive solution, the archived e-mails are preserved, available, searchable and accessible.

  • From Big Data to Personal Data: The Next Generation of Digital Management (Lee Boulie, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum)

    With the increased ease of creating and storing personal data, staying organized in the face of deluge is becoming a necessary and vital skillset for anyone dealing with files in the workplace or seeking to capture their personal content history for future generations. This poster will focus on lessons learned from managing a museum’s 2.5 million item collection of moving images, photos, print, and audio/music materials; and applying that insight to personal data curation, long term access, and preservation. Best practices for prioritizing content, applying file naming conventions, file hierarchy maintenance, storage selection, dealing with information overload and keeping information secure will be presented. This poster will share a solid understanding of the principles, best practices and types of software systems currently in play in the professional Digital Asset Management field.

  • Saveit.Photo (Júlia Pontés)

    Until the Millennial generation the concept of personal and family photographic archive consisted of the album making, negative saving and professional development and printing. The photographs were physical objects that, with proper conservation practices, could last for more than a century. During the past 10-12 years a transition started to take place and that redefined the way our personal history and imagery is made and stored.

    Many of the photographs taken with early digital camera back from the mid 2000’s are barely readable. Nevertheless, whoever made prints are at least ahead as the prints can be scanned. Those who kept their imagery on CD’s, that is very sensitive to scratches, mold high temperatures, might not be able to reach their data.

    A 2015 Info Trends survey forecasted that 1.3 trillion images will be taken in 2017. In 2010, this number was 0.35 trillion, and 60% of them were taken with actual cameras. Now this number might be as low as 13%.

    Families are taken many photos, much more than it could ever be conceived only 15 years ago. And, even though moments are being recorded more than ever, those files might not be accessible for the following family generation. Museums, Libraries and Archives have long been thinking about digital conservation and developing strong methodologies for that. Nevertheless, they are often kept to a limited group, not making part of the general collective knowledge, thought  or practice.

    Starting to look at digital imagery and data as perishable items and creating easy proactive conservation and archiving methods may be the key for long term personal “memorabilia” access for families.

    I am currently using the knowledge I acquired as a digital and analogue photographer, a professional printer and photographic asset manager to develop “Saveit.photos” which consist of creating a conservation dialogue among non professional image makers and teaching and playing simplified techniques to help individuals, families and even professional photographers to rethink their archives and make them accessible for a longer period of time.

Speakers
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
avatar for Anssi Jääskeläinen

Anssi Jääskeläinen

R&D, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Anssi Jääskeläinen has an IT MSc. (2005) from Lappeenranta University of Technology and a PhD (2011) from the same university. He has an extensive knowledge of user experience and usability. His current interests are in format migration, open source development and virtualization.
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.
TW

Todd Wemmer

Todd Wemmer first became involved with audio-storytelling while using voicemail as a research method to collect stories about lost-and-found personal photographs (lostandfoundphotos.org). Another recent project (Withcameras.com) combines collaborative audio narration with vintage snapshots of women using cameras.  Todd’s research often as combined audio and the visual world.      Todd’s current work includes a... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

11:15am

Session 2: Preserving & Serving PDA at Memory Institutions
Second-Generation Digital Archives: What We Learned from the Salman Rushdie Project (Dorothy Waugh & Elizabeth Russey Roke, Emory University)

Composing an Archive: the personal digital archives of contemporary composers in New Zealand (Jessica Moran, National Library of New Zealand)

Learning from users of personal digital archives at the British Library (Rachel Foss, The British Library)

Presentation Details:

  • Second-Generation Digital Archives: What We Learned from the Salman Rushdie Project (Dorothy Waugh and Elizabeth Russey Roke, Emory University)

    In 2010, Emory University announced the launch of the Salman Rushdie Digital Archives. This reading room kiosk offered researchers at the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library the opportunity to explore born-digital material from one of four of Rushdie’s personal computers through dual access systems: 1) A searchable, browse-able database of files migrated to PDF/A; and 2) A simulation of Rushdie’s original computing environment provided via emulation.

    Moving from acquiring Rushdie’s computers to providing reading room access to his files and computing environment involved a steep learning curve as archivists and software engineers grappled with how the nature of born-digital files affected arrangement, description and access at a time when relatively few institutions were working with born-digital material. This was also the team’s first foray into digital forensics, and they worked closely with Rushdie to balance concerns regarding privacy and security alongside the needs of our prospective researchers. The resulting first-generation product has proven to be an important case study, but one that we increasingly see as a starting—as opposed to ending—point as best practices related to born-digital archival materials continue to emerge.

    In the six years that have passed since then, the remaining Rushdie computers have been processed. The completion of this work, plus the upcoming deployment of the Hydra repository solution at Emory Libraries, has required a reassessment of the work done in 2010 with an eye to making new Rushdie content available to researchers and migrating the existing Salman Rushdie Digital Archives to our new repository system. This presentation will discuss what we have learned in this process and how these lessons will inform the development of a new tool that we hope will provide access to all of our processed born-digital collections, not just the Salman Rushdie Digital Archives.

  • Composing an Archive: the personal digital archives of contemporary composers in New Zealand (Jessica Moran, National Library of New Zealand)

    The National Library of New Zealand houses the Archive of New Zealand Music and has, since 1974, collected the documentary heritage of New Zealand music and musicians. In recent years the Library has acquired the digital archives of a number of prominent contemporary composers. This presentation will look at the personal digital archive of one such composer and examine how the personal digital archiving practices of the composer have informed, helped, and challenged the preservation of the archive. The digital component of the collection spanned over 20 years and includes generations of proprietary composition and music creation software, often with multiple software and file dependencies. The archive includes digital compositions, scores, and audio and video recordings, as well as digital diaries, correspondence, and other manuscript material. In this case the composer worked consciously to manage and save his personal digital archive before transfer to the library, however this did not translate into a seamless or challenge free processing of the collection, especially for archivists who were more experienced dealing with textual-based digital archives.

    This presentation will discuss the personal digital archiving practices of the composer, the composition of the archive, and the work of the digital archivists, in collaboration with curators, arrangement and description librarians, and audio-visual conservators, to collect, describe, and preserve this collection. In the process it will attempt to offer some lessons learned and share potential considerations for those who may find themselves working with similar collections.

  • Learning from users of personal digital archives at the British Library (Rachel Foss, The British Library)

    As there is currently little provision for public access to the born digital archive collections held at the British Library, there is little data available from researchers about their experience of discovering, accessing and using this material in their work. The British Library aims to be user-led in its provision of services to researchers and user feedback is crucial in helping collecting repositories develop their processing workflows. Archives professionals also need to consider how we assist and educate our researchers to make use of our born-digital collections, which means understanding more about how they want to interrogate these collections as a resource. The British Library holds born-digital archives relating to pre-eminent writers, scientists and cultural organisations. We have piloted access to the born digital material in the Hanif Kureishi Archive and have worked with users to test it and offer feedback which we will use to inform and improve our future workflow and access model.  This presentation will discuss what we have learned.

Moderators
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →

Speakers
RF

Rachel Foss

The British Library
Rachel Foss is Head of Contemporary Archives and Manuscripts at the British Library where she has curatorial responsibility for the Library’s collections of post war archives across literature, theatre, politics, public life and history of science. Prior to taking this role in 2015 she was the Library’s lead curator for modern literary manuscripts. She studied English Literature and gained a Master’s degree in Victorian... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Moran

Jessica Moran

National Library of New Zealand
Jessica Moran is a digital archivist and currently Leader, Digital Collections Services at the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand where she is responsible for supporting the teams managing the acquisition, ingest, and management of born-digital cultural heritage collections, including web archives and the heritage access and preservation digitisation programmes. Prior to moving to New Zealand, she worked in libraries and... Read More →
ER

Elizabeth Russey Roke

Digital Archivist, Emory University
Elizabeth Russey Roke is the Digital Archivist and Metadata Specialist in the Rose Library at Emory University. Primarily focused on preservation, discovery, and access to digitized and born digital assets from special collections, Elizabeth works on a variety of technology projects and initiatives related to repository development, metadata standards, and archival description. Elizabeth is particularly interested in linked data approaches to... Read More →
DW

Dorothy Waugh

Digital Archivist, Emory University
Dorothy Waugh is MARBL's Digital Archivist at Emory University where she is responsible for the acquisition and management of the Rose Library's born-digital collections. She received her MLS from Indiana University and her MA in English Literature from Ohio State University.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 11:15am - 12:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

12:30pm

Lunch
There are several lunch options within walking distance to Lathrop Library. Perhaps the closest, which offers a variety of lunch options, is Arbuckle Dining Pavilion, at the Graduate School of Business.

 

Wednesday March 29, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Arbuckle Dining Pavilion Stanford Graduate School of Business, 655 Knight Way, Stanford, CA 94305

2:00pm

Session 3: Teaching PDA
Journalism Archive Management (JAM): Preparing journalism students to manage their personal digital assets and diffuse JAM best practices into the media industry (Dorothy Carner & Edward McCain, University of Missouri)

An archivist in the lab with a codebook: Using archival theory and “classic” detective skills to encourage reuse of personal data (Carly Dearborn, Purdue University Libraries)

Presentation Details:

  • Journalism Archive Management (JAM): Preparing journalism students to manage their personal digital assets and diffuse JAM best practices into the media industry (Dorothy Carner & Edward McCain, University of Missouri)

    The University of Missouri (MU) School of Journalism is one of the leading institutions for media training and industry-oriented research. In collaboration with MU Libraries and the school’s Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, a personal digital archive (PDA) learning model has been developed and deployed in order to prepare journalism-school students, faculty and staff for their ongoing information storage and access needs. The MU J-School has created a set of PDA best practices for journalists and branded it: Journalism Archive Management (JAM). Our presentation outlines the who, what, when, where, why and how of integrating JAM ideas and practices into the hands-on learning process at MU. This exemplifies the Missouri Method of learning by doing, which has been practiced for over a century at the School of Journalism on the University of Missouri System flagship campus in Columbia. 

  • An archivist in the lab with a codebook: Using archival theory and “classic” detective skills to encourage reuse of personal data (Carly Dearborn, Purdue University Libraries). 

    One of the biggest data management challenges novice researchers face is joining a new research lab. Not only are they joining a new team and research project, but also are dealing with new data and collaboration practices. Additionally, many research labs have legacy issues; students turn over every few years and they often take with them the institutional knowledge that helped the project or lab run smoothly. The majority of instruction around the topic of data management focuses on developing sustainable habits, but few resources address the challenges surrounding the “data handoff” event, when one idiosyncratic data producer passes data onto another idiosyncratic data producer. Archivists are well versed in dealing with idiosyncratic records creators. The basic detective work archivists perform daily such as asking who, what, where, when, and why can also applicable in the laboratory setting to understand the context, structure, and usability of an unfamiliar dataset.

    This presentation will discuss my efforts to help novice researchers - at undergraduate and graduate levels - understand unfamiliar data by applying basic archival processing methods. I designed a workshop inspired by the Society of Georgia Archivists’ personal digital archiving activities and building on current primary source and data management instruction at Purdue. Through the workshop and supplementary activities, I introduced attendees to archival concepts and techniques which can be applied to familiarize researchers with new data structures. Additionally, I demonstrated how the same techniques to explore new data can also be used to keep files and data usable in the long-term. Applying lessons from archival processing, data management, and personal digital archiving, researchers can ensure their own data structure can weather everything from staffing to software changes.

Moderators
CR

Charles Ransom

American Culture and Multicultural Studies Librarian, University of Michigan

Speakers
DC

Dorothy Carner

Head, Journalism Libraries, University of Missouri
Dorothy Carner is Head of the Journalism Libraries and Adjunct Professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri.  Carner oversees the management of the Frank Lee Martin Journalism and Columbia Missourian Libraries and a journalism collection designated a “collection of distinction” by OCLC.  She provides instruction, research and multimedia creation support for the faculty, students, alumni of the... Read More →
avatar for Carly Dearborn

Carly Dearborn

Digital Preservation Archivist, Purdue University Libraries
Carly Dearborn is the Digital Preservation and Electronic Records Archivist with Purdue University Libraries. She leads the development of digital preservation services within the Libraries and is also responsible for appraisal, description, and preservation of the University's unique digital collections of high research value. Carly is on the Purdue University Research Repository (PURR) where she helps establish best practices in digital... Read More →
avatar for Edward McCain

Edward McCain

Digital Curator of Journalism, University of Missouri Libraries / Reynolds Journalism Institute
As founder of the Journalism Digital News Archive agenda, Edward McCain's prime directive is saving the "first rough draft" of history created on a computer or digital sensor. He also leads JDNA's "Dodging the Memory Hole" outreach initiative. McCain holds a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri, Columbia and a Masters degree in Information Science and graduate certificate in Digital Information Management from the... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

2:45pm

Session 4: Emergent Technologies & PDA 1
Cogifo Ergo Sum: GifCities & Personal Archives on the Web (Maria Praetzellis & Jefferson Bailey, Internet Archive)

Comparison of Aggregate Tools for Archiving Social Media (Melody Condron)

Video games collectors and archivists: how might private archives influence archival practices (Adam Lefloic Lebel, University of Montreal)

Presentation details:

  • Cogifo Ergo Sum: GifCities & Personal Archives on the Web (Maria Praetzellis & Jefferson Bailey, Internet Archive)

    GeoCities was an early web hosting service, started in 1994, that allowed users to create their own web pages. From personal and family websites to neighborhood and community groups, from creative showcase to memorial sites, the platform hosted over 38 million user-built pages from across the globe and was at one time the third most visited site on the web. Purchased by Yahoo in 1999 for $3.6 billion, the service was eventually shut down in 2009. Prior to closure, the Internet Archive archived as much of the content as possible.

    As part of its 20th anniversary, the Internet Archive build GifCities (http://gifcities.org/), the GeoCities Animated GIF Search Engine, comprising over 4.6 million animated GIFs from the GeoCities web archive. Each GIF links back to the archived GeoCities web page upon which it was originally embedded. The search engine offers a novel, flabbergasting window into what is likely one of the largest aggregations of publicly-accessible archival personal documentary collections. It also provokes a reassessment of how we conceptualize personal archives as being both from the web (as historical encapsulations) and of the web (as networked recontextualization).

    The presentation will describe the project and investigate a number of issues that emerged during its development:

    How do we think of “personal archives” in the era of the web?

    What inventive modes of access are possible when personal archives are engaged as aggregations?

    How can discovery interfaces to aggregations of personal archives repurpose the embedded aesthetics of their origin platforms?

    What is the future of access for born-digital, web-published personal archives?
    What is the mediating role of technologies in personal web-based collections?

    How can web archives help both democratize the historical record of individuals and exponentially scale preservation and access?

    How awesome are early-web GIFs?

  • Comparison of Aggregate Tools for Archiving Social Media (Melody Condron)

    This session will review and compare multiple aggregate third-party tools for archiving social media platforms. Comparison to built in tools for Facebook and Twitter will also be included, as well as suggestions for which tools to use based on the needs of an archival project.

  • Video games collectors and archivists: how might private archives influence archival practices (Adam Lefloic Lebel, University of Montreal)

    Before universities, libraries and museums took interest in video games and started thinking about the preservation of the industry’s heritage, the community of video game players took it upon themselves to preserve their favorite hobby. Projects like the Killer List of Videogames (KLOV), The Cover Project, AtariAge, and World of Spectrum, to name a few, were created by avid independent gamers. Melanie Salwell (2006) mentions that “Retro-gamer groups have developed some important historical and preservation endeavors of considerable significance to game historians.” Passionate amateurs from around the world have developed an expertise that they share among their network. The preservation of video games, both physical and digital, has been the center of their interest; the community has developed techniques and guides to take care of these artifacts. Although some methods are not necessarily the best (and sometimes even be harmful), the newcomer may always find procedures that have been tested and approved by the community.

    This presentation will look at how the video games collectors, who are amateur archivists, preserve video games and compare those procedures with those in archival literature. We will then be able to evaluate the work of these collectors and talk about their usefulness in the whole endeavor that is video games preservation. Are their procedures really improving the long term preservation of the legacy of video games or are the collectors only thinking of their own short-term personal gain? Could the amateurs’ archival techniques help the official archival preservation of video games? Could a cooperative effort between personal and professional archivists be beneficial to preserve the whole heritage of video games? Finally, what would be the best way to both ensure the preservation of those games and their accessibility to game historians and other academics?

Moderators
avatar for Nicholas Taylor

Nicholas Taylor

Program Manager, LOCKSS and Web Archiving, Stanford University Libraries
Nicholas Taylor is Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving at Stanford University Libraries. In this role, he manages the provision of distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks, including the Global LOCKSS Network and the CLOCKSS Archive. He also oversees efforts by Stanford University Libraries to establish web archiving as a core collection development activity and... Read More →

Speakers
JB

Jefferson Bailey

Director, Web Archiving, Internet Archive
Jefferson Bailey is Director, Web Archiving at Internet Archive. Jefferson joined Internet Archive in Summer 2014 and manages Internet Archive's web archiving services including Archive-It, used by over 450 institutions to preserve the web. He also oversees contract domain-scale web archiving services for national libraries and archives around the world. He works closely with partner institutions on collaborative archiving technology development... Read More →
avatar for Melody Condron

Melody Condron

University of Houston
Melody Condron is the Resource Description and Management Coordinator at the University of a Houston Libraries. She has presented on a number of PDA topics at multiple conferences and her book on Personal Digital Archiving, Managing the Digital You, was released in March of 2017 from Rowman & Littlefield.
avatar for Adam Lefloic Lebel

Adam Lefloic Lebel

University of Montreal
First contributor: Adam Lefloïc Lebel is a Master student in Game Studies at Université de Montréal. His research interests are related to video games collectors and their archival practices.
avatar for Maria Praetzellis

Maria Praetzellis

Program Manager, Internet Archive
Maria Praetzellis: Maria is a Program Manager in the Web Archiving group of Internet Archive, which includes both Archive-It (https://archive-it.org/) as well as web archiving and preservation services for national libraries, collaborative and grant-funded initiatives, research and access services and technology development.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:45pm

Break
Enjoy coffee and light pastries while you view demonstrations and posters. 

Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:45pm

Posters 1
  • From Scrapbooks to Apps: Lifelogging Data and its Place in Personal Archiving (Leanna Barcelona).

    Lifelogging, the practice of tracking personal data generated by our behaviors and movements, has become increasingly popular with the development of technology. Devices, websites, and apps allow individuals to track their daily lives in an innovative way. While scrapbooking is not a lost art, people are progressively using technology to create an archive of their personal memories. This poster looks at the use of two different types of lifelogging technologies, FitBit and Exist, and analyzes the benefits and drawbacks they exhibit. It will also explore the future lifelogging data has within the personal archiving world. Future generations may look to this data to better understand today’s populations. Rather than opening your great-grandmother’s scrapbook, you may be opening an excel file of data explaining every step she ever took. With the growth in lifelogging and the Quantified Self Movement, it is important for professionals and researchers to understand how this will affect a historically paper-dominant field. Through this poster, I hope to establish a better understanding of how technology is changing current practices in personal archiving and its usage by others.
     
  • Making Data Management Manageable: A Risk Analysis Activity for Managing Research Data (Elise Dunham, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    Funders, libraries, and journals are emphasizing the importance of research data management to sound academic research. Many hear about the challenges associated with haphazard data management, which are, at their core, personal information management challenges, and some already face these challenges themselves. Even though many researchers fundamentally understand that practices like naming files consistently, backing up hard drives, and writing documentation about research processes are crucial to the success of their work, they tend to consider the task of data management to be daunting and all-too time-consuming. Seeing a need from local researchers for implementable solutions to managing research data, the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing practical data management exercises that are of use to all campus researchers. One outcome of these efforts is a risk analysis activity that encourages researchers to think about the risks associated with unmanaged data. The goal of this activity is for researchers to feel empowered to prioritize their data management activities and motivated to tackle data management in focused phases. In this poster, I introduce the risk analysis activity, demonstrating risk management concepts and highlighting its applicability to other managing other types of information management. The goal of this poster is to inspire those working across a variety of domains to put risk analysis concepts to work in other types of personal information management efforts. As the amount of personal information increases at seemingly insurmountable rates, the need for practical, easy-to-digest methods to prioritize time, money, and energy when managing personal information will remain.

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow) [CANCELED]

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. The Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge).

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  •  Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, Ashoka University).

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. This poster will present the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

Speakers
avatar for Leanna Barcelona

Leanna Barcelona

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois
Leanna Barcelona is a current graduate student at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is working towards certification in Special Collections and intends to graduate in May 2017. Leanna has worked at the University Archives for over two years, starting as a student assistant while completing her undergraduate work and then becoming a graduate assistant while completing her masters. In her role at... Read More →
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Elise Dunham

Elise Dunham

Data Curation Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist at the University of Illinois, integrally involved with the launch of the Illinois Data Bank. Dunham has a background in archives and a current focus on privacy, sensitive data, and appraisal in the context of research data.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:45pm

Posters 2
  • Women’s March on Washington Archives Project (Katrina Vandeven)

    This poster presents the methods by which the Women’s March on Washington Archives Project collected and preserved materials and oral histories from the Women’s Marches on January 21st, 2017. It will particularly highlight the methods by which a large scale oral history collection was implemented nationwide and globally within one month, the triumphs and failures of the project, and the author’s reflection of the project’s creation and implementation. 

    Author: Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate University of Denver, Co-Founder Women's March on Washington Archives Project. Collaborator: Danielle Russell, Archives Assistant at the Southern Maryland Studies Center, Co-Founder of Women's March on Washington Archives Project.

  • Photos Die Podcast (Todd Wemer, Endicott College). 

    In my recent dissertation, which theoretically explores personal photography, memory, and concepts of the archive, I included an online audio component, in the form of a voicemail number that people could call to tell stories about lost and/or found photographs. These little audio gems in many ways have become the most important “results” of my completed dissertation (May 2016). Over the course of my fall sabbatical (2016) I’ve been recording audio stories, interviewing people, re-interviewing research subjects, planning a sound rich podcast based on many of the themes I covered in my dissertation.

    Photos Die will be a narrative driven podcast based on the stories we tell about photographs and the photographs we use to tell our stories. The end result I hope to be equally pleasing to a listener of story driven podcasts, as well as scholars interested in personal archives.

  • Preserving precious emails - citizen archive (Anssi Jääskeläinen)

    Inside “secure” shoe boxes at the attic, written on floppy disks or scratched CD-ROMs, laying on the hard drive. This is how old family archives have been made.  To make things more difficult, during the past few decades the playground of the archival masters has grown to include e-mails, online communities and social media as well, in other words, family archives are distributed. When the archival masters are passing away, many of these precious archives are doomed, not necessarily due to ignorance, but due to obsolescence. Naturally there are lots of other reasons, but this paper focuses on how to manage the obsolescence in the case of e-mails.

    The national archives have their preferred and acceptable formats for preserving e-mails. However, these formats such as .pst are software dependent and therefore not easily viewable on other devices or products. Further on, the fonts, image placements, etc. aspects of the e-mail might change between e-mail viewers and this is not acceptable for archival content. Thirdly, does an average citizen know what to do with a file that for example ends with .ost? Finally, there are ways to save e-mails directly into an archival format. However, it is principally wrong to obligate the ordinary citizen to handle this task.

    The presented solution is a fully automated conversion from a proprietary e-mail format (Outlook .pst or .ost) into validated PDF/A-3b files which includes every metadata field that the original e-mail item had. Our approach of handling email data files is fully based on utilizing existing open source products which are bound together with the combination of Python and Java. We have implemented some steps in the workflow in order to get the data conversion completely processed. When integrated with the citizen archive solution, the archived e-mails are preserved, available, searchable and accessible.

  • From Big Data to Personal Data: The Next Generation of Digital Management (Lee Boulie, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum)

    With the increased ease of creating and storing personal data, staying organized in the face of deluge is becoming a necessary and vital skillset for anyone dealing with files in the workplace or seeking to capture their personal content history for future generations. This poster will focus on lessons learned from managing a museum’s 2.5 million item collection of moving images, photos, print, and audio/music materials; and applying that insight to personal data curation, long term access, and preservation. Best practices for prioritizing content, applying file naming conventions, file hierarchy maintenance, storage selection, dealing with information overload and keeping information secure will be presented. This poster will share a solid understanding of the principles, best practices and types of software systems currently in play in the professional Digital Asset Management field.

  • Saveit.Photo (Júlia Pontés)

    Until the Millennial generation the concept of personal and family photographic archive consisted of the album making, negative saving and professional development and printing. The photographs were physical objects that, with proper conservation practices, could last for more than a century. During the past 10-12 years a transition started to take place and that redefined the way our personal history and imagery is made and stored.

    Many of the photographs taken with early digital camera back from the mid 2000’s are barely readable. Nevertheless, whoever made prints are at least ahead as the prints can be scanned. Those who kept their imagery on CD’s, that is very sensitive to scratches, mold high temperatures, might not be able to reach their data.

    A 2015 Info Trends survey forecasted that 1.3 trillion images will be taken in 2017. In 2010, this number was 0.35 trillion, and 60% of them were taken with actual cameras. Now this number might be as low as 13%.

    Families are taken many photos, much more than it could ever be conceived only 15 years ago. And, even though moments are being recorded more than ever, those files might not be accessible for the following family generation. Museums, Libraries and Archives have long been thinking about digital conservation and developing strong methodologies for that. Nevertheless, they are often kept to a limited group, not making part of the general collective knowledge, thought  or practice.

    Starting to look at digital imagery and data as perishable items and creating easy proactive conservation and archiving methods may be the key for long term personal “memorabilia” access for families.

    I am currently using the knowledge I acquired as a digital and analogue photographer, a professional printer and photographic asset manager to develop “Saveit.photos” which consist of creating a conservation dialogue among non professional image makers and teaching and playing simplified techniques to help individuals, families and even professional photographers to rethink their archives and make them accessible for a longer period of time.

Speakers
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
avatar for Anssi Jääskeläinen

Anssi Jääskeläinen

R&D, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Anssi Jääskeläinen has an IT MSc. (2005) from Lappeenranta University of Technology and a PhD (2011) from the same university. He has an extensive knowledge of user experience and usability. His current interests are in format migration, open source development and virtualization.
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.
TW

Todd Wemmer

Todd Wemmer first became involved with audio-storytelling while using voicemail as a research method to collect stories about lost-and-found personal photographs (lostandfoundphotos.org). Another recent project (Withcameras.com) combines collaborative audio narration with vintage snapshots of women using cameras.  Todd’s research often as combined audio and the visual world.      Todd’s current work includes a... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:50pm

Demonstration 1: Name that File!

Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives

While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 


Speakers
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:50pm - 4:10pm
Lathrop 290 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:50pm

Demonstration 2: ePADD
Analyzing personal email with ePADD

ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyzea nd provide access to email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. We will demonstrate/discuss the software in the context of personal digital archiving.


Speakers
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:50pm - 4:10pm
Lathrop 292 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:50pm

Demonstration 3: Digital Archive of Personal Professional Materials
Demonstration 3: Digital Archive of Personal Professional Materials, Hosted at Libraries for Long-Term Historical Research

The online interactive digital archive to be demonstrated is an exhibit of the Stanford University Libraries: the “Edward A. Feigenbaum Papers.” Although a finished project and product, it is really a prototype of what libraries should be building and hosting to make available materials that record the intellectual life of eminent scholars. The target audiences are people doing historical research, and students examining the history of particular people and ideas. The “Edward A. Feigenbaum Papers” collection primarily concerns his work in artificial intelligence (AI) at Stanford University, and in his public service. It  includes administrative and project files, correspondence, proposals, reports, reprints, AI Lab preprints, audio tapes, video tapes, and files on computer programs, including EPAM, DENDRAL, MOLGEN, MYCIN, the language IPL-V, and others. The collection includes papers documenting the histories of the main laboratories in which he did his collaborations: Heuristic Programming Project, Knowledge Systems Laboratory, and SUMEX-AIM. Finally, there are documents related to Feigenbaum's public service to the US Air Force (as Chief Scientist), the National Institutes of Health, the National Library of Medicine, the National Science Foundation, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The physical materials are stored in 78 boxes, with access delays of days. In the online version, all materials have been scanned into PDF files with OCR backing, so that every word of most materials is searchable by keywords, using a Google-like search. Other navigation tools offer alternate paths of access, including a “similarity” search based on word frequencies in documents. Every item is downloadable by the user. This digital archive was built using the Zotero software for the editing and annotation of metadata (done by Feigenbaum); and collection management software developed by Stanford Libraries’ Digital Libraries Systems & Services (DLSS).



Speakers
avatar for Scott Van Duyne

Scott Van Duyne

Consultant to Stanford Library and Office of Technology Licensing, Stanford University
Dr. Van Duyne, a PhD from Stanford in Computer-based Music Theory and Acoustics, co-founded a successful music and audio synthesis start-up. In addition to contributing to the Feigenbaum collection project, he consults at the Stanford Office of Technology Licensing, and is part of a team working on a new technology to analyze open data sources to track collaboration in research.
avatar for Edward Feigenbaum

Edward Feigenbaum

PROFESSOR EMERITUS, CS, Stanford University
Professor Feigenbaum retired from the Stanford Computer Science Department in 2000. His main activities since then have been the Feigenbaum Papers archive project with the Stanford Libraries; member of the Board of Trustees of the Computer History Museum; and consulting for the US Air Force and industry. Feigenbaum is an interdisciplinary computer scientist who pioneered Expert Systems and the knowledge-based approaches to artificial... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:50pm - 4:10pm
Lathrop 294 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:50pm

Demonstration 4: Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL)
Web Archiving Integration Layer -- WAIL

Personal Web archiving requires enabling individuals to preserve Web content at will. In previous work, we introduced Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL), a tool that integrates an archival crawler (Heritrix) and replay system (Wayback) to facilitate individuals' preservation. In this work, we have vastly revised WAIL using modern Web technologies and introduced the concept of collection-based personal Web archiving that can be accomplished on a user's machine. Unlike subscription-based Web archiving services, like Archive-It, WAIL provides an interoperable mechanism to accomplish this without reliance on an external service. We rebuilt WAIL using its core concept into an Electron-based native application for a more consistent and accessible interface with better integration with Heritrix, OpenWayback, and other personal Web Archiving tools. Electron has allowed WAIL to be more consistent across the Mac, Windows, and Linux platforms. A central focus of this update has been on social media, mainly the preservation of users' Twitter feeds. In contrast to the previous versions of WAIL, our revision leverages a native Chromium browser via Electron to surface content specific to sites like Twitter for more accurate preservation. This additional functionality will allow users to focus on preservation of personal Web content that may have previously been difficult to archive.



Speakers
JB

John Berlin

Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group
John Berlin is a Computer Science Masters student at Old Dominion University and a member of the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group (WS-DL) under the supervision of Dr. Michele Weigle and Dr. Michael Nelson. His work with the group includes contributions to the web archiving tool Mink and is primary developer for WAIL


Wednesday March 29, 2017 3:50pm - 4:10pm
Lathrop 296 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:15pm

Session 5: Emergent Technologies & PDA 2
CiteTool: Leveraging Software Collections for Historical Research (Eric Kaltman, UC Santa Cruz)

Applying technology of Scientific Open Data to Personal Closed Data (Jean-Yves Le Meur, CERN)

Personal Data and the Personal Archive (Chelsea Gunn, University of Pittsburgh)

Using Markdown for PDA Interoperability (Jay Datema, Stony Brook University)

Presentation Details:

  • CiteTool: Leveraging Software Collections for Historical Research (Eric Kaltman, UC Santa Cruz)

    This presentation describes the purpose and functionality of the CiteTool, a prototype command-line script and web application aimed at helping software historians manage and reveal legacy applications. The CiteTool allows for the management of a personal software research collection, and provides facilities for in-browser emulation of NES, SNES, and DOS images, along with in-browser video capture and save and load state. Program state is saved according to each emulator's save state format (for NES and SNES) or in a generic JavaScript byte array (DOSBox). Each state is provided with a dedicated URL that allows for linking directly into a running program.

    The tool is currently being used in a historical exploration of the computer game DOOM as a way to compare conditions across versions and to save key locations for future historical work. Since the tool provides links to saved locations, it is also possible to share states amongst researchers in collaborative environments. The links also function as an executable citation in cases where an argument about a program’s functionality is under discussion and would benefit from first-hand execution.

    Lastly, the citation tool is a speculative one, in that it aims to show, in a limited way, the potential of more robust software archives and the ways that executable content can be leveraged in ways that other forms of embedded content, like video and images, cannot.

    The presentation will primarily consist of a run through of the system's basic features, along with some practical examples from our research in the history of DOOM as well as a few other games (time permitting). We are also willing to have this present in a demo as well.

  • Applying technology of Scientific Open Data to Personal Closed Data (Jean-Yves Le Meur, CERN)

    At CERN, the Digital Memory project is driving the creation of an OAIS Archive that should cover a wide range of content, from scientific datasets to simple web pages, still or moving images and  physics preprints. Today, parallel repositories are offering dedicated services to well established communities. Many of them rely on the Invenio open source software, so that the on-going effort to connect Invenio with the Archivematica OAIS-compliant package will enable a standard preservation within a shared store.

    The challenging question of Personal Data archiving should take advantage of the lessons learnt from the management of academic content types. Its more specific requirements should then be well identified in order to be better addressed.

    The presentation will explain how the methodology and technologies developed (partly at CERN) to preserve scientific data (like High Energy Physics) could be re-used for Personal restricted data. Existing initiatives to collect and preserve for very long term the personal data from individuals will first be reviewed, as well as a few examples of well established collective memory portals. Solutions implemented for Open data in HEP will then be compared, looking at the guiding principles and underlying technologies. Finally, a proposal to foster a solid shared platform for closed Personal Data Archive will be drafted on the model of Open Scientific Data Archives. 

  • Personal Data and the Personal Archive (Chelsea Gunn, University of Pittsburgh)

    This presentation will explore the implications of the personal data that we create about ourselves (as well as the data that is created about us) through the use of quantified self and lifelogging applications. Are these forms of personal data part of our personal archives, or do they constitute a form of ephemera, useful for the purposes of tracking progress toward a goal, but not of long-term interest? Included in this discussion is a brief overview of the programs and applications that we as individuals track our reading, water drinking, exercise, eating, and meditation habits, as well as the available methods of exporting, analyzing, or preserving this personal data for longer term use or analysis.

  • Using Markdown for PDA Interoperability (Jay Datema, Stony Brook University)

    In this presentation, I will advocate for text as an intermediate format. Following the lead of Aaron Swartz, I recommend his coauthored invention, Markdown, as a preferred format for personal digital archiving.

    Simply, Markdown is an intermediate step between text and HTML. If you're writing anything that requires a HTML link, its shortcuts are worth learning.Most web applications rely on the humble submit button. Once text goes in, it becomes part of a database backend. To extract it, it may require a set of database calls, or parsing a SQL file, or hoping that someone wrote a module to let you download what you entered.

    The only thing you can count on with born-digital projects is that you will have to migrate the content at some point. But having done digital library development for over a decade, I'd like to talk about simple text, and a problem that has a proven solution.

Moderators
avatar for Henry Lowood

Henry Lowood

Curator, History of Science & Technology, Stanford University

Speakers
JD

Jay Datema

Jay Datema has an MBA from Binghamton University (2007), a Masters in Library and Information Science from Dominican University (1999), and a BA in Literature from Wheaton College (1995). He has worked as a reference librarian at Mann Library, Cornell University; as product and project manager at Ovid Technologies; as a systems librarian and digital project developer at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Library and Archives; as technology editor... Read More →
avatar for Chelsea Gunn

Chelsea Gunn

University of Pittsburgh
Chelsea Gunn is a doctoral student in Library and Information Science at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Computing and Information. Rooted in the intersection of archival theory, media archaeology, and digital preservation, her work explores the impact of networked personal digital records on professional archival practice.
EK

Eric Kaltman

University of California, Santa Cruz
Eric Kaltman is a PhD candidate in Computer Science in the Expressive Intelligence Studio at UC Santa Cruz. He is currently the project manager for the IMLS-funded Game and Metadata Citation Project, a collaboration between Stanford University Library and UCSC to further understanding of games in institutional collections. His work explores interventions in the historical narratives surrounding games, and deals with the practical challenges of... Read More →
avatar for Jean-Yves Le Meur

Jean-Yves Le Meur

CERN
Jean-Yves Le Meur is currently the Project leader of CERN's Digital Memory project, after having launched and managed CERN Document Server and its underlying open source Institutional Repository software - Invenio - for many years.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

5:15pm

Session 6: PDA & the Arts
From Virtual to Reality: Dissecting Jennifer Steinkamp’s Software-Based Installation (Shu-Wen Lin, New York University)

The PDAs of Others: Completeness, Confidentiality, and Creepiness in the Archives of Living Subjects (Glen Worthey, Stanford University)

RuschaView 2.0 (Stace Maples, Stanford University)

Van Detritus (Pete Schreiner, NCSU)

Presentation Details:

  • From Virtual to Reality: Dissecting Jennifer Steinkamp’s Software-Based Installation (Shu-Wen Lin, New York University)

    Time-based and digital art combines media and technology that challenges traditional conservation practices while requiring dedicated care. As a pioneer in media art, contemporary artist Jennifer Steinkamp is critically acclaimed for her abilities to weave digital media into large-scale installations that envelop the audience vis-a-vis streams of moving images. In this paper, I use Steinkamp’s animated installation Botanic that was exhibited in Times Square Arts: Midnight Moment as a case study. Through carefully disassembling the artist’s creation process, I attempt to focus on the internal structure and relationship between Maya, After Effects, scripts, and final deliverables. I strive to provide a risk assessment that will enable museum professionals as well as the artist herself to identify sustainability and compatibility of digital elements in order to build a documentation that can collect and preserve the whole spectrum of digital objects related to the piece.

  • The PDAs of Others: Completeness, Confidentiality, and Creepiness in the Archives of Living Subjects (Glen Worthey, Stanford University)

    The title and inspiration for this presentation come from the 2006 German film Das Leben der Anderen, which dramatizes the covert monitoring of East Germans -- even in their most intimate and human moments -- by the Stasi.

    But the substance of the presentation comes from my experiences researching the life and thought of a living subject, a science writer (among other professions), for a planned biography.  Although the biography is "authorized" by a very cooperative, and even enthusiastic, subject, the work of gathering and documenting materials often reveals tensions between completeness and a respect for privacy; between on-the-record and off-the-record conversations; between the personal and the professional; between the probing of important questions and voyeuristic-seeming observation of the subject's complex inner life.

    Because my subject has used email since its very beginnings, his email archive in particular is enormous and daunting, for both technical and intellectual reasons: its sheer mass, its blending of the deeply personal and the raw materials that feed his public writings.  Likewise, his substantial collection of digitized drafts and unpublished, informal writing is extensive.  Many digital versions of his writings are his transcriptions of his own juvenilia: are these to be trusted outright, or should one be skeptical of the interventions and corrections possibly made by the adult transcriber, a self-conscious stickler for error-free writing?  Similar questions arise in the digital documentation and capture of his extensive paper files.

    In agreeing to be a subject, surely my subject has not given up his right to privacy; but in seeking to write a life, surely a researcher must also never refrain from seeking the deepest truths of his subject's life, always remembering that he must earn the trust of his future readers through careful, complete, and meticulous research.

  • RuschaView 2.0 (Stace Maple, Stanford University

    In 1964, LA Painter, Ed Ruscha put a Nikon Camera in the back of his truck, drove up and down Sunset Strip and shot what would become a continuous panorama of "Every Building on the Sunset Strip" (1966). Though the 1966 publication was the only finished product from the project, Ruscha has continued to shoot Sunset Strip and other iconic urban landscapes in La, since. I was asked to take a look at the collection by a close friend and have been obsessed with finding a way to place these images into a digital context, like Google StreetView. This talk will highlight both Ruscha's multi-decade project, as well as my multi-month attempt to create the metadata required to reproduce something like Ruscha's "Every Building..." publication, in a digital context.

  • Van Detritus (Pete Schreiner, NCSU)

    Between 2003-2013 an associated group of independent rocks bands from Bloomington, Indiana shared a tour van. The spartan Chevrolet Express cargo van was a home away from home for dozens of trips throughout the contiguous United States and Canada. At the end of each trip, the accrued ephemera—tourist memorabilia, posters, guitar parts, CDs, books, contracts, clothing, and found objects—were necessarily removed and stored ad hoc in the van owner’s basement. When the owner, a librarian, was preparing to move across the country in 2014, Pete Schreiner, band member and proto-librarian, decided to preserve this esoteric collection of local music-related history. He performed a rush-operation to photograph the 400+ items in this collection over a long weekend. Subsequently, as time allowed, he created an online collection of the photographs using Omeka. This case study presents a guerrilla archiving project, issues encountered throughout the process, and attempts to find the balance between professional archiving principles and getting it done.

Moderators
avatar for Kate Tasker

Kate Tasker

Digital Archivist, The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley
I'm a Digital Archivist at the Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley, working on appraisal, ingest, processing, preservation, and providing access for born-digital archives. I'm especially interested in digital forensics methods for obsolete media and in processing and preserving email archives. I also work on our ArchivesSpace migration, implementation, and documentation. | | In my spare time I love cycling (I also bike to work) and being... Read More →

Speakers
SL

Shu-Wen Lin

Associate Time-Based Media Conservator, M+ Museum
Shu-Wen Lin received her MA from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at New York University in 2016. For the past five years, she has been working with physical and digital collections to cultivate her interests and passion for preserving the landscape of twentieth and twenty-first century art, photography, design and architecture. Prior to and following NYU, Shu-Wen gained experience while working at a number of institutions... Read More →
SM

Stace Maples

Stanford Geospatial Center
Stace Maples is the Geospatial Manager of The Stanford Geospatial Center, at Branner Earth Sciences Library, Stanford University. His job is to help Stanford researchers leverage geospatial technologies in research and teaching, whatever that means at any given time. He's a self proclaimed Geo-Evangelist and Geospatial Swiss Army Knife. He has a terrible sense of direction.
avatar for Pete Schreiner

Pete Schreiner

Fellow, NCSU Libraries
Pete Schreiner is a Libraries Fellow at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, working in Access Services, and Learning Spaces & Services. Prior to NCSU, he was Assistant Archivist at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and film intern at the Oregon Historical Society Moving Image and Photography Collections. Before librarianship Pete ran a creative carpentry business, worked in DIY media and design, and was a touring musician. Pete... Read More →
avatar for Glen Worthey

Glen Worthey

Digital Humanities Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
Glen Worthey has been Digital Humanities Librarian in the Stanford University Libraries since 1997, and co-leads the Libraries' new Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR). He hosted the international "Digital Humanities 2011" conference at Stanford, serves on the Steering Committee for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), and is a co-convener of the “DH in Libraries” Special Interest Group... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

6:00pm

Demonstrations
  • Digital Archive of Personal Professional Materials, Hosted at Libraries for Long-Term Historical Research (Edward Feigenbaum & Scott Van Duyne, Stanford University). 

    The online interactive digital archive to be demonstrated is an exhibit of the Stanford University Libraries: the “Edward A. Feigenbaum Papers.” Although a finished project and product, it is really a prototype of what libraries should be building and hosting to make available materials that record the intellectual life of eminent scholars. The target audiences are people doing historical research, and students examining the history of particular people and ideas. The “Edward A. Feigenbaum Papers” collection primarily concerns his work in artificial intelligence (AI) at Stanford University, and in his public service. It  includes administrative and project files, correspondence, proposals, reports, reprints, AI Lab preprints, audio tapes, video tapes, and files on computer programs, including EPAM, DENDRAL, MOLGEN, MYCIN, the language IPL-V, and others. The collection includes papers documenting the histories of the main laboratories in which he did his collaborations: Heuristic Programming Project, Knowledge Systems Laboratory, and SUMEX-AIM. Finally, there are documents related to Feigenbaum's public service to the US Air Force (as Chief Scientist), the National Institutes of Health, the National Library of Medicine, the National Science Foundation, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The physical materials are stored in 78 boxes, with access delays of days. In the online version, all materials have been scanned into PDF files with OCR backing, so that every word of most materials is searchable by keywords, using a Google-like search. Other navigation tools offer alternate paths of access, including a “similarity” search based on word frequencies in documents. Every item is downloadable by the user. This digital archive was built using the Zotero software for the editing and annotation of metadata (done by Feigenbaum); and collection management software developed by Stanford Libraries’ Digital Libraries Systems & Services (DLSS)

  • Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, ePADD)

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. We will demonstrate/discuss the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge). 

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Publishat: Personal Lifecycle Management Tool (Suresh Jagarlamudi)

    We designed “Publishat” based on personal data as a paradigm. We developed a framework for managing personal data for a lifetime. We organised personal data into 6 major areas: Academics, Personal, Professional, Health, Financial and Legal.  There is another dimension, Communication, which is mandatory for all the major areas. The content is created using the Personal Lifecycle Management framework, is context-based, and is therefore effective in aiding decision making.

  • Save digital memories online with Kumbu (Ziad Wakim, Kumbu)

    Kumbu is a digital souvenir box service. Today, all our personal memories are digital. We own and produce way too much data. We never clean up. Kumbu is a service to help preserve your favorite digital memories. It can be pictures & videos, but also natively digital content, such as cherished emails, posts and comments on social networks, your favorite blogposts, your greatest food recipes, your music playlists and more. It allows anyone with a computer to gather every part of their digital footprint in a single place. We’ve been building Kumbu for the past year, and I’ll be happy to show it you, as well as exchange on what we’ve learned in the process about how people feel, and act with their Personal Digital Archives. It will also be an opportunity to reflect and share some of the challenges of building a private, secure online service for personal data.

  •   Spotlight: Digital Exhibits (Cathy Aster, Stanford University).

    Spotlight is an innovative solution that enables libraries and other cultural heritage institutions to build online exhibits from content in their repositories to better highlight their digital collections. Spotlight is a plugin for Blacklight, which is a popular open source solution for building library discovery environments. Spotlight enhances Blacklight by providing a self-service forms-based user interface that allows exhibit-builders, such as librarians or faculty, to customize the search interface and homepage, and to build media-rich feature pages to better contextualize their collections. 

  • Webrecorder (Ilya Kreymer).

    Webrecorder is a free online tool that allows users to create their own high-fidelity archives of the dynamic web. Current digital preservation solutions involve complex, automated processes that were designed for a web made up of relatively static documents. Webrecorder, in contrast, can capture social media and other dynamic content, such as embedded video and complex javascript, while putting the user at the center of the archiving process. Ilya Kreymer is lead developer and creator of Webrecorder
     
  • Web Archiving Integration Layer -- WAIL (John Berlin, Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group).

    Personal Web archiving requires enabling individuals to preserve Web content at will. In previous work, we introduced Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL), a tool that integrates an archival crawler (Heritrix) and replay system (Wayback) to facilitate individuals' preservation. In this work, we have vastly revised WAIL using modern Web technologies and introduced the concept of collection-based personal Web archiving that can be accomplished on a user's machine. U…

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Aster

Cathy Aster

Product & Service Manager, Stanford University Libraries
I am a service manager in Digital Library Systems and Services, a department in Stanford Libraries. In my role, I manage both services and projects, and I also work as a product owner with software engineers, operations staff and designers for the digital library applications I help support. I am the service manager for: Stanford’s Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission Program, Stanford’s exhibit platform - called Spotlight, and the... Read More →
JB

John Berlin

Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group
John Berlin is a Computer Science Masters student at Old Dominion University and a member of the Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group (WS-DL) under the supervision of Dr. Michele Weigle and Dr. Michael Nelson. His work with the group includes contributions to the web archiving tool Mink and is primary developer for WAIL
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Scott Van Duyne

Scott Van Duyne

Consultant to Stanford Library and Office of Technology Licensing, Stanford University
Dr. Van Duyne, a PhD from Stanford in Computer-based Music Theory and Acoustics, co-founded a successful music and audio synthesis start-up. In addition to contributing to the Feigenbaum collection project, he consults at the Stanford Office of Technology Licensing, and is part of a team working on a new technology to analyze open data sources to track collaboration in research.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
avatar for Edward Feigenbaum

Edward Feigenbaum

PROFESSOR EMERITUS, CS, Stanford University
Professor Feigenbaum retired from the Stanford Computer Science Department in 2000. His main activities since then have been the Feigenbaum Papers archive project with the Stanford Libraries; member of the Board of Trustees of the Computer History Museum; and consulting for the US Air Force and industry. Feigenbaum is an interdisciplinary computer scientist who pioneered Expert Systems and the knowledge-based approaches to artificial... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Suresh Jagarlamudi

Suresh Jagarlamudi

CEO, Publishat
Suresh did MS (by Research) from IIT Madras, Chennai on Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems implementation in Indian Industry. He is working as CEO at iPublish Advanced Technology Solutions (iPublish ATS). A Solution Architect for Personal Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems – www.publishat.com (Android and iOS apps are available on app stores) and a job portal www.wikijobs.co.in. | | He is a Certified PMP from Project... Read More →
IK

Ilya Kremer

Webrecorder
Lead developer of Webrecorder, Rhizome.org
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →
avatar for Ziad Wakim

Ziad Wakim

CEO, Kumbu
Ziad WAKIM is the founder of Kumbu. After 15 years building enterprise information management systems, initially for libraries, then archives and enterprises, he founded Kumbu to provide individuals with tools to preserve, enjoy and share their personal digital archives, in a secure and private manner. He currently lives in Paris, France.


Wednesday March 29, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

6:00pm

Posters 1
  • From Scrapbooks to Apps: Lifelogging Data and its Place in Personal Archiving (Leanna Barcelona).

    Lifelogging, the practice of tracking personal data generated by our behaviors and movements, has become increasingly popular with the development of technology. Devices, websites, and apps allow individuals to track their daily lives in an innovative way. While scrapbooking is not a lost art, people are progressively using technology to create an archive of their personal memories. This poster looks at the use of two different types of lifelogging technologies, FitBit and Exist, and analyzes the benefits and drawbacks they exhibit. It will also explore the future lifelogging data has within the personal archiving world. Future generations may look to this data to better understand today’s populations. Rather than opening your great-grandmother’s scrapbook, you may be opening an excel file of data explaining every step she ever took. With the growth in lifelogging and the Quantified Self Movement, it is important for professionals and researchers to understand how this will affect a historically paper-dominant field. Through this poster, I hope to establish a better understanding of how technology is changing current practices in personal archiving and its usage by others.
     
  • Making Data Management Manageable: A Risk Analysis Activity for Managing Research Data (Elise Dunham, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    Funders, libraries, and journals are emphasizing the importance of research data management to sound academic research. Many hear about the challenges associated with haphazard data management, which are, at their core, personal information management challenges, and some already face these challenges themselves. Even though many researchers fundamentally understand that practices like naming files consistently, backing up hard drives, and writing documentation about research processes are crucial to the success of their work, they tend to consider the task of data management to be daunting and all-too time-consuming. Seeing a need from local researchers for implementable solutions to managing research data, the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing practical data management exercises that are of use to all campus researchers. One outcome of these efforts is a risk analysis activity that encourages researchers to think about the risks associated with unmanaged data. The goal of this activity is for researchers to feel empowered to prioritize their data management activities and motivated to tackle data management in focused phases. In this poster, I introduce the risk analysis activity, demonstrating risk management concepts and highlighting its applicability to other managing other types of information management. The goal of this poster is to inspire those working across a variety of domains to put risk analysis concepts to work in other types of personal information management efforts. As the amount of personal information increases at seemingly insurmountable rates, the need for practical, easy-to-digest methods to prioritize time, money, and energy when managing personal information will remain.

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow) [CANCELED]

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. The Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge).

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  •  Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, Ashoka University).

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. This poster will present the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

Speakers
avatar for Leanna Barcelona

Leanna Barcelona

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois
Leanna Barcelona is a current graduate student at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is working towards certification in Special Collections and intends to graduate in May 2017. Leanna has worked at the University Archives for over two years, starting as a student assistant while completing her undergraduate work and then becoming a graduate assistant while completing her masters. In her role at... Read More →
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Elise Dunham

Elise Dunham

Data Curation Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist at the University of Illinois, integrally involved with the launch of the Illinois Data Bank. Dunham has a background in archives and a current focus on privacy, sensitive data, and appraisal in the context of research data.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

6:00pm

Posters 2
  • Women’s March on Washington Archives Project (Katrina Vandeven)

    This poster presents the methods by which the Women’s March on Washington Archives Project collected and preserved materials and oral histories from the Women’s Marches on January 21st, 2017. It will particularly highlight the methods by which a large scale oral history collection was implemented nationwide and globally within one month, the triumphs and failures of the project, and the author’s reflection of the project’s creation and implementation. 

    Author: Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate University of Denver, Co-Founder Women's March on Washington Archives Project. Collaborator: Danielle Russell, Archives Assistant at the Southern Maryland Studies Center, Co-Founder of Women's March on Washington Archives Project.

  • Photos Die Podcast (Todd Wemer, Endicott College). 

    In my recent dissertation, which theoretically explores personal photography, memory, and concepts of the archive, I included an online audio component, in the form of a voicemail number that people could call to tell stories about lost and/or found photographs. These little audio gems in many ways have become the most important “results” of my completed dissertation (May 2016). Over the course of my fall sabbatical (2016) I’ve been recording audio stories, interviewing people, re-interviewing research subjects, planning a sound rich podcast based on many of the themes I covered in my dissertation.

    Photos Die will be a narrative driven podcast based on the stories we tell about photographs and the photographs we use to tell our stories. The end result I hope to be equally pleasing to a listener of story driven podcasts, as well as scholars interested in personal archives.

  • Preserving precious emails - citizen archive (Anssi Jääskeläinen)

    Inside “secure” shoe boxes at the attic, written on floppy disks or scratched CD-ROMs, laying on the hard drive. This is how old family archives have been made.  To make things more difficult, during the past few decades the playground of the archival masters has grown to include e-mails, online communities and social media as well, in other words, family archives are distributed. When the archival masters are passing away, many of these precious archives are doomed, not necessarily due to ignorance, but due to obsolescence. Naturally there are lots of other reasons, but this paper focuses on how to manage the obsolescence in the case of e-mails.

    The national archives have their preferred and acceptable formats for preserving e-mails. However, these formats such as .pst are software dependent and therefore not easily viewable on other devices or products. Further on, the fonts, image placements, etc. aspects of the e-mail might change between e-mail viewers and this is not acceptable for archival content. Thirdly, does an average citizen know what to do with a file that for example ends with .ost? Finally, there are ways to save e-mails directly into an archival format. However, it is principally wrong to obligate the ordinary citizen to handle this task.

    The presented solution is a fully automated conversion from a proprietary e-mail format (Outlook .pst or .ost) into validated PDF/A-3b files which includes every metadata field that the original e-mail item had. Our approach of handling email data files is fully based on utilizing existing open source products which are bound together with the combination of Python and Java. We have implemented some steps in the workflow in order to get the data conversion completely processed. When integrated with the citizen archive solution, the archived e-mails are preserved, available, searchable and accessible.

  • From Big Data to Personal Data: The Next Generation of Digital Management (Lee Boulie, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum)

    With the increased ease of creating and storing personal data, staying organized in the face of deluge is becoming a necessary and vital skillset for anyone dealing with files in the workplace or seeking to capture their personal content history for future generations. This poster will focus on lessons learned from managing a museum’s 2.5 million item collection of moving images, photos, print, and audio/music materials; and applying that insight to personal data curation, long term access, and preservation. Best practices for prioritizing content, applying file naming conventions, file hierarchy maintenance, storage selection, dealing with information overload and keeping information secure will be presented. This poster will share a solid understanding of the principles, best practices and types of software systems currently in play in the professional Digital Asset Management field.

  • Saveit.Photo (Júlia Pontés)

    Until the Millennial generation the concept of personal and family photographic archive consisted of the album making, negative saving and professional development and printing. The photographs were physical objects that, with proper conservation practices, could last for more than a century. During the past 10-12 years a transition started to take place and that redefined the way our personal history and imagery is made and stored.

    Many of the photographs taken with early digital camera back from the mid 2000’s are barely readable. Nevertheless, whoever made prints are at least ahead as the prints can be scanned. Those who kept their imagery on CD’s, that is very sensitive to scratches, mold high temperatures, might not be able to reach their data.

    A 2015 Info Trends survey forecasted that 1.3 trillion images will be taken in 2017. In 2010, this number was 0.35 trillion, and 60% of them were taken with actual cameras. Now this number might be as low as 13%.

    Families are taken many photos, much more than it could ever be conceived only 15 years ago. And, even though moments are being recorded more than ever, those files might not be accessible for the following family generation. Museums, Libraries and Archives have long been thinking about digital conservation and developing strong methodologies for that. Nevertheless, they are often kept to a limited group, not making part of the general collective knowledge, thought  or practice.

    Starting to look at digital imagery and data as perishable items and creating easy proactive conservation and archiving methods may be the key for long term personal “memorabilia” access for families.

    I am currently using the knowledge I acquired as a digital and analogue photographer, a professional printer and photographic asset manager to develop “Saveit.photos” which consist of creating a conservation dialogue among non professional image makers and teaching and playing simplified techniques to help individuals, families and even professional photographers to rethink their archives and make them accessible for a longer period of time.

Speakers
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
avatar for Anssi Jääskeläinen

Anssi Jääskeläinen

R&D, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Anssi Jääskeläinen has an IT MSc. (2005) from Lappeenranta University of Technology and a PhD (2011) from the same university. He has an extensive knowledge of user experience and usability. His current interests are in format migration, open source development and virtualization.
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.
TW

Todd Wemmer

Todd Wemmer first became involved with audio-storytelling while using voicemail as a research method to collect stories about lost-and-found personal photographs (lostandfoundphotos.org). Another recent project (Withcameras.com) combines collaborative audio narration with vintage snapshots of women using cameras.  Todd’s research often as combined audio and the visual world.      Todd’s current work includes a... Read More →


Wednesday March 29, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

6:00pm

All-Attendee Reception
Enjoy refreshments with your colleagues on the Lathrop terrace while you view software demonstrations and poster presentations.

Wednesday March 29, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Lathrop Courtyard Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94310
 
Thursday, March 30
 

6:30am

PDA Fun Run
Pack your gear before coming out to Palo Alto, because we're going to have a very informal (and very fun) fun run on Thursday morning!

We'll start promptly at 6:30 am on Thursday, March 30, in front of Lathrop Library (where our conference sessions are being held), run through the heart of the lovely Stanford campus, and up onto the paved footpath of the legendary Stanford Dish radio telescope.

Sticking to the lower portion of the Dish loop,* we'll have beautiful (almost aerial) views of campus, the San Francisco Bay, and Silicon Valley.  We'll return through the historic San Juan neighborhood (home to many Stanford faculty since the University's founding), past Frank Lloyd Wright's 1937 Hanna "Honeycomb" House, and back to Lathrop, for a total of 4.0 fun miles.

We've been granted permission for conference attendees to use campus locker / shower facilities closeby. Lathrop is also only a 10-15 minute jog from most of your hotels, so there should also be plenty of time to get there, cleaned up, and back in time for Thursday's 8:30 keynote.

Questions? Write to Glen Worthey at gworthey AT stanford.edu. (RSVPs would also be appreciated, even if tentative, so we know about how many people to expect; not required, of course: all are welcome.)

Looking forward to running with you!

Glen

* The upper portion of the Dish loop offers even more beautiful views of both Nature and Civilization, adding about 1.5 miles to the run (including a couple of deliciously gnarly hills).  Depending on everyone's preferred pace and distance, we could opt for the longer run (which would make the timing a bit tight) -- or we could split into two groups ("fun" and "funner").  Regardless, we'll be flexible and make sure no one is lost or left behind.


Thursday March 30, 2017 6:30am - 7:30am
Front Entrance, Lathrop Library 518 Memorial Way, Stanford CA 94305

8:00am

Registration / Coffee
Thursday March 30, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

8:25am

Announcements
Announcements from the PDA 2017 Planning Committee.

Thursday March 30, 2017 8:25am - 8:30am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

8:30am

Keynote 2: Kim Christen

Personal, Political, Public: Digital Archiving the Present

Introduction by Karen Biestman, Associate Dean and Director, Native American Cultural Center, Stanford University.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Christen

Kim Christen

Associate Professor and Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program, Washington State University
Kim Christen is an Associate Professor in the Department of English, the Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program, Director of Digital Projects at the Plateau Center, Native American Programs, and co-Director of the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation at Washington State University. Her work explores the intersections of cultural heritage, archival access, traditional knowledge, intellectual property rights, the ethics of... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 8:30am - 9:15am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

9:15am

Session 7: Documenting Cultures & Communities
A Revolution Online and On the Quad: Capturing Student Activism at the University of Illinois (Anna Trammell, University of Illinois)

Online Grieving and Intimate Archives: a Cyberethnographic Approach (Jennifer Douglas, University of British Columbia)

Unveiling a Forgotten Time in Afghanistan: A Collaborative Personal Archives Project (Barbara Jenkins, University of Oregon)

Saving Hip-Hop! Documenting, Archiving, and Curating Hip-Hop Culture (Martha Diaz, New York University)

Presentation Details:


  • A Revolution Online and On the Quad: Capturing Student Activism at the University of Illinois (Anna Trammell, University of Illinois)

    When students at the University of Illinois protested the Vietnam War or organized demonstrations to highlight inequalities during the Civil Rights Movement, they communicated through flyers and underground newspapers. These documents, along with correspondence, photographs, and other physical materials, tell the story of these student activists and how they highlighted national injustices at the local level.

    Today, student organizations are forming at the University of Illinois in response to the inequalities experienced nationwide by students of color, shootings of unarmed black men by police and, most recently, the results of the 2016 Presidential Election. These activist organizations are publicizing protests through social media, issuing calls to action in the form of online videos, and coining hashtags to facilitate discussion.

    At the University of Illinois Student Life and Culture Archives, I am working with student activist organizations to capture, preserve, and share their digital records. In this talk, I will discuss my experience forming relationships and building trust with these organizations, capturing and processing their digital content, and utilizing these records in instruction and outreach.

  • Online grieving and intimate archives: a cyberethnographic approach (Jennifer Douglas, University of British Columbia)

    At the Personal Digital Archives conference in 2015 in New York, I presented a short paper discussing the archiving practices of a particular online community: the community of parents grieving stillborn children. In that paper, I explained how through the building of online grief communities (in blogs, message boards, community websites, through the use of Twitter hashtags, etc) bereaved parents found both an outlet for their grief and a means of remembering and sharing their lost children. I demonstrated how these communities functioned as aspirational archives, not only preserving the past, but creating a space in the world – a kind of present and future – for their deceased children. The paper I propose this year will discuss ongoing research on this project. It will present a particular case study of one mother’s digital personal archives, focusing on: the type of memory work performed online; the life cycle of online grief communities; and especially, the ethical issues associated with researching and archiving intimate and vulnerable online communities. Regarding the ethics of online research and archiving, the paper will introduce the methodology of cyberethnography and explore its potential connections to the work of digital archivists.

  • Unveiling a Forgotten Time in Afghanistan: A Collaborative Personal Archives Project (Barbara Jenkins, University of Oregon)

    For most Americans, Afghanistan is identified by the post-9/11 photos of U.S. soldiers in a stark landscape of war.  This digital project brings to life a different and forgotten time in Afghanistan (1950 – 1970).  The archive documents Afghanistan’s people, traditions, agriculture, and landscapes before decades of war.  It also tells the story of two decades of Afghan-American relationships focused on higher education and agricultural development and the American scientists and educators who made Afghanistan their home.

    The project was originally conceived as a single-family archive, but has evolved into a project that combines five families’ personal archives.  The collection combines over 4,000 slides, prints, negatives, letters, maps, oral histories, and primary documents. The presentation will focus on both the image-rich historical content and on the issues and technologies involved in digitizing large personal collections. The presentation will discuss the selection, organization, technical tools, and interpersonal issues involved in building a historic multi-family digital archive. I will discuss the use of social media for archival collaboration across generations and the decisions involved in transforming a family heirloom archive into an institutional collection.

    I initiated the development of this Afghanistan personal archives project in 2012 and was able to expand its scope through a short sabbatical supported by the University of Oregon in 2016. Upon completion, both digital and analog collections will be donated to the University of Wyoming American Heritage Center.

  • Saving Hip-Hop! Documenting, Archiving, and Curating Hip-Hop Culture (Martha Diaz, New York University)

    Hip-hop culture is undeniably an American treasure that should be studied, practiced, and   preserved. Hip-hop has contributed to the innovation of the arts, music, media production, technology, entrepreneurship, and education. A culture formed in New York City forty-three years ago out of poverty, violence, disenfranchised and marginalized communities, hip-hop continues to grow and expand with the creativity and energy of new generations. Today hip-hop is ubiquitously transmitted through radio, television, advertisements, music videos, movies, video games, social media, and the Internet. Hip-hop and the media play a critical role in our lives; they impact the way we form our identity and ideas, shape how we see others and the world around us, and influence our choices and consumer behavior. We rarely have public discussions around the importance of archiving and curating these audiovisual materials that are documenting and programming our existence. The real urgency lies in the fact that audiovisual formats are at a higher risk of obsolescence and the media content can disappear altogether through deterioration, poor storage and damage. Saving Hip-Hop: Documenting, Archiving and Curating a Global Cultural Movement will highlight key issues and best practices related to archiving and preserving hip-hop audiovisual material. The main purpose of this presentation is 1) Inform the community about the importance of archiving and preserving hip-hop culture. 2) Offer examples of institutional partnerships and collaborations that ensure hip-hop stakeholders are included in the current and future process of cultural preservation and programming. 3) Develop interest  in the archiving and preservation field and create opportunities for the hip-hop community to recruit future archivists and curators and play an active role in the documentation, preservation and interpretation of our own history.


Moderators
avatar for Michael Olson

Michael Olson

Service Manager, Born-Digital / Forensics Labs, Stanford University Libraries
Michael Olson is the Service Manager for the Born-Digital / Forensics Labs at Stanford University. In this role he is responsible for building the service portfolio for materials that begin their life as bits and bytes.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Diaz

Martha Diaz

Founder / Director, Hip-Hop Education Center
Martha Diaz is an award winning community organizer, social entrepreneur, media producer, archivist, curator, mentor, and educator. For two decades, Diaz has traversed between the hip-hop entertainment industry, non-profit sector and academia. She has worked in Hollywood and independent movie productions, producing short films, TV shows, documentaries, music videos, and PSA’s. Diaz founded, produced and curated the Hip-Hop Odyssey... Read More →
JD

Jennifer Douglas

Assistant Professor, SLAIS, the iSchool@UBC
avatar for Barbara Jenkins

Barbara Jenkins

Director of Instruction and Campus Partnerships, UO Libraries
Education: 1982: Masters in Library Science, University of Chicago | 1978: Bachelor of Arts, Biology, Earlham College | 1977: Certificate of German Language Study, Marburg, Germany | Teaching/Service/Selected Publications: Presentations:"Interfacing with the Future," Northwest Innovative Users Group, 1997"WebPac Plus," Oregon Library Association, 1997."The Web in Your Front Yard," RUSA (Reference and User Services Association) Performance... Read More →
avatar for Anna Trammell

Anna Trammell

Archival Operations and Reference Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Anna Trammell is the Archival Operations and Reference Specialist at the University of Illinois Archives Research Center/Student Life and Culture Archives. She holds an MLIS from the University of Illinois iSchool.


Thursday March 30, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

10:30am

Break
Enjoy coffee and light pastries while you view demonstrations and posters. 

Thursday March 30, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

10:30am

Posters 1
  • From Scrapbooks to Apps: Lifelogging Data and its Place in Personal Archiving (Leanna Barcelona).

    Lifelogging, the practice of tracking personal data generated by our behaviors and movements, has become increasingly popular with the development of technology. Devices, websites, and apps allow individuals to track their daily lives in an innovative way. While scrapbooking is not a lost art, people are progressively using technology to create an archive of their personal memories. This poster looks at the use of two different types of lifelogging technologies, FitBit and Exist, and analyzes the benefits and drawbacks they exhibit. It will also explore the future lifelogging data has within the personal archiving world. Future generations may look to this data to better understand today’s populations. Rather than opening your great-grandmother’s scrapbook, you may be opening an excel file of data explaining every step she ever took. With the growth in lifelogging and the Quantified Self Movement, it is important for professionals and researchers to understand how this will affect a historically paper-dominant field. Through this poster, I hope to establish a better understanding of how technology is changing current practices in personal archiving and its usage by others.
     
  • Making Data Management Manageable: A Risk Analysis Activity for Managing Research Data (Elise Dunham, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    Funders, libraries, and journals are emphasizing the importance of research data management to sound academic research. Many hear about the challenges associated with haphazard data management, which are, at their core, personal information management challenges, and some already face these challenges themselves. Even though many researchers fundamentally understand that practices like naming files consistently, backing up hard drives, and writing documentation about research processes are crucial to the success of their work, they tend to consider the task of data management to be daunting and all-too time-consuming. Seeing a need from local researchers for implementable solutions to managing research data, the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing practical data management exercises that are of use to all campus researchers. One outcome of these efforts is a risk analysis activity that encourages researchers to think about the risks associated with unmanaged data. The goal of this activity is for researchers to feel empowered to prioritize their data management activities and motivated to tackle data management in focused phases. In this poster, I introduce the risk analysis activity, demonstrating risk management concepts and highlighting its applicability to other managing other types of information management. The goal of this poster is to inspire those working across a variety of domains to put risk analysis concepts to work in other types of personal information management efforts. As the amount of personal information increases at seemingly insurmountable rates, the need for practical, easy-to-digest methods to prioritize time, money, and energy when managing personal information will remain.

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow) [CANCELED]

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. The Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge).

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  •  Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, Ashoka University).

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. This poster will present the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

Speakers
avatar for Leanna Barcelona

Leanna Barcelona

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois
Leanna Barcelona is a current graduate student at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is working towards certification in Special Collections and intends to graduate in May 2017. Leanna has worked at the University Archives for over two years, starting as a student assistant while completing her undergraduate work and then becoming a graduate assistant while completing her masters. In her role at... Read More →
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Elise Dunham

Elise Dunham

Data Curation Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist at the University of Illinois, integrally involved with the launch of the Illinois Data Bank. Dunham has a background in archives and a current focus on privacy, sensitive data, and appraisal in the context of research data.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

10:30am

Posters 2
  • Women’s March on Washington Archives Project (Katrina Vandeven)

    This poster presents the methods by which the Women’s March on Washington Archives Project collected and preserved materials and oral histories from the Women’s Marches on January 21st, 2017. It will particularly highlight the methods by which a large scale oral history collection was implemented nationwide and globally within one month, the triumphs and failures of the project, and the author’s reflection of the project’s creation and implementation. 

    Author: Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate University of Denver, Co-Founder Women's March on Washington Archives Project. Collaborator: Danielle Russell, Archives Assistant at the Southern Maryland Studies Center, Co-Founder of Women's March on Washington Archives Project.

  • Photos Die Podcast (Todd Wemer, Endicott College). 

    In my recent dissertation, which theoretically explores personal photography, memory, and concepts of the archive, I included an online audio component, in the form of a voicemail number that people could call to tell stories about lost and/or found photographs. These little audio gems in many ways have become the most important “results” of my completed dissertation (May 2016). Over the course of my fall sabbatical (2016) I’ve been recording audio stories, interviewing people, re-interviewing research subjects, planning a sound rich podcast based on many of the themes I covered in my dissertation.

    Photos Die will be a narrative driven podcast based on the stories we tell about photographs and the photographs we use to tell our stories. The end result I hope to be equally pleasing to a listener of story driven podcasts, as well as scholars interested in personal archives.

  • Preserving precious emails - citizen archive (Anssi Jääskeläinen)

    Inside “secure” shoe boxes at the attic, written on floppy disks or scratched CD-ROMs, laying on the hard drive. This is how old family archives have been made.  To make things more difficult, during the past few decades the playground of the archival masters has grown to include e-mails, online communities and social media as well, in other words, family archives are distributed. When the archival masters are passing away, many of these precious archives are doomed, not necessarily due to ignorance, but due to obsolescence. Naturally there are lots of other reasons, but this paper focuses on how to manage the obsolescence in the case of e-mails.

    The national archives have their preferred and acceptable formats for preserving e-mails. However, these formats such as .pst are software dependent and therefore not easily viewable on other devices or products. Further on, the fonts, image placements, etc. aspects of the e-mail might change between e-mail viewers and this is not acceptable for archival content. Thirdly, does an average citizen know what to do with a file that for example ends with .ost? Finally, there are ways to save e-mails directly into an archival format. However, it is principally wrong to obligate the ordinary citizen to handle this task.

    The presented solution is a fully automated conversion from a proprietary e-mail format (Outlook .pst or .ost) into validated PDF/A-3b files which includes every metadata field that the original e-mail item had. Our approach of handling email data files is fully based on utilizing existing open source products which are bound together with the combination of Python and Java. We have implemented some steps in the workflow in order to get the data conversion completely processed. When integrated with the citizen archive solution, the archived e-mails are preserved, available, searchable and accessible.

  • From Big Data to Personal Data: The Next Generation of Digital Management (Lee Boulie, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum)

    With the increased ease of creating and storing personal data, staying organized in the face of deluge is becoming a necessary and vital skillset for anyone dealing with files in the workplace or seeking to capture their personal content history for future generations. This poster will focus on lessons learned from managing a museum’s 2.5 million item collection of moving images, photos, print, and audio/music materials; and applying that insight to personal data curation, long term access, and preservation. Best practices for prioritizing content, applying file naming conventions, file hierarchy maintenance, storage selection, dealing with information overload and keeping information secure will be presented. This poster will share a solid understanding of the principles, best practices and types of software systems currently in play in the professional Digital Asset Management field.

  • Saveit.Photo (Júlia Pontés)

    Until the Millennial generation the concept of personal and family photographic archive consisted of the album making, negative saving and professional development and printing. The photographs were physical objects that, with proper conservation practices, could last for more than a century. During the past 10-12 years a transition started to take place and that redefined the way our personal history and imagery is made and stored.

    Many of the photographs taken with early digital camera back from the mid 2000’s are barely readable. Nevertheless, whoever made prints are at least ahead as the prints can be scanned. Those who kept their imagery on CD’s, that is very sensitive to scratches, mold high temperatures, might not be able to reach their data.

    A 2015 Info Trends survey forecasted that 1.3 trillion images will be taken in 2017. In 2010, this number was 0.35 trillion, and 60% of them were taken with actual cameras. Now this number might be as low as 13%.

    Families are taken many photos, much more than it could ever be conceived only 15 years ago. And, even though moments are being recorded more than ever, those files might not be accessible for the following family generation. Museums, Libraries and Archives have long been thinking about digital conservation and developing strong methodologies for that. Nevertheless, they are often kept to a limited group, not making part of the general collective knowledge, thought  or practice.

    Starting to look at digital imagery and data as perishable items and creating easy proactive conservation and archiving methods may be the key for long term personal “memorabilia” access for families.

    I am currently using the knowledge I acquired as a digital and analogue photographer, a professional printer and photographic asset manager to develop “Saveit.photos” which consist of creating a conservation dialogue among non professional image makers and teaching and playing simplified techniques to help individuals, families and even professional photographers to rethink their archives and make them accessible for a longer period of time.

Speakers
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
avatar for Anssi Jääskeläinen

Anssi Jääskeläinen

R&D, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Anssi Jääskeläinen has an IT MSc. (2005) from Lappeenranta University of Technology and a PhD (2011) from the same university. He has an extensive knowledge of user experience and usability. His current interests are in format migration, open source development and virtualization.
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.
TW

Todd Wemmer

Todd Wemmer first became involved with audio-storytelling while using voicemail as a research method to collect stories about lost-and-found personal photographs (lostandfoundphotos.org). Another recent project (Withcameras.com) combines collaborative audio narration with vintage snapshots of women using cameras.  Todd’s research often as combined audio and the visual world.      Todd’s current work includes a... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

10:45am

Session 8: Narratives & Biases: PDA & Social Justice

This panel will examine the narratives and biases that have impacted PDA in the past, and approaches that some are taking to push the needle towards social justice, including citizen documentation.

Citizen documentation is increasingly becoming inextricable from the work of many activist and social justice communities. This documentation can act as counter-evidence, a way of speaking back to the means and methods of evidence gathering by the state. Over the past few years, citizen documentation of fatal encounters with police have served as a catalyst for many overlapping communities, exposing the urgency of confronting police violence, the techno-utopian allure of surveillance technologies and the speed with which technologies of dissemination can disperse, disconnect and re-contextualize.

Building tools for collecting, authenticating, organizing, storing and accessing myriad forms and formats of documentation within proposes both challenges and opportunities and with instances of police violence we must confront the ways in which calls for authentication might force us to operate within the juridical framework of evidentiary value or whether we need to redefine evidentiary value in community terms. Recordings made with a smart phone are certainly personal digital records, but they immediately become embroiled in a network of legal and technological issues through the use of corporately owned infrastructures and through evidence law to name a few.

Andrea Pritchett, co-founder of Berkeley Copwatch, Robin Margolis, UCLA MLIS in Media Archives, and Ina Kelleher, PhD student in Comparative Ethnic Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, will present a proposed design for a digital archive aggregating different sources of documentation toward the goal of tracking individual officers. Copwatch chapters operate from a framework of citizen documentation of the police as a practice of community-driven accountability and de-escalation.  

Stacy Wood, PhD candidate in Information Studies at UCLA, will discuss the ways in which personal records and citizen documentation are embedded within techno-socio-political infrastructural arrangements and how we can reframe these technologies as mechanisms and narratives of resistance.

Moderators
avatar for Kim Christen

Kim Christen

Associate Professor and Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program, Washington State University
Kim Christen is an Associate Professor in the Department of English, the Director of the Digital Technology and Culture Program, Director of Digital Projects at the Plateau Center, Native American Programs, and co-Director of the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation at Washington State University. Her work explores the intersections of cultural heritage, archival access, traditional knowledge, intellectual property rights, the ethics of... Read More →

Speakers
IK

Ina Kelleher

Ina Kelleher is a doctoral student in the department of Comparative Ethnic Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies. Her dissertation project analyses how grief and mourning are experienced and performed, both publically and privately, by mothers who lose their children to gun violence. Ina is also a Graduate Student Researcher with Dr. Nikki Jones on the project “Good Stranger” an ethnographic study of... Read More →
avatar for Robin Margolis

Robin Margolis

MLIS Media Archival Studies, UCLA Information Studies Department
Robin Margolis is a current MLIS student specializing in Media Archival Studies at the UCLA Department of Information Studies. He approaches archives from a foundation as a teaching artist, community organizer, and filmmaker, aiming to serve social movements both emergent and ongoing.  His research interests involve community-based archiving, oral history in the digital age, personal digital archiving, archiving performance, archives as a site... Read More →
AP

Andrea Prichett

Founder, Berkeley Copwatch
Andrea Pritchett is a founding member of Berkeley Copwatch and has been active in the group since it's start in 1990. Berkeley Copwatch works with community volunteers to counteract increased harassment of homeless people, young people of color and activists by police, sharing its models and strategies with other police monitoring groups, and creating resources including Know Your Rights (KYR) trainings educating communities about their rights in... Read More →
SW

Stacy Wood

PhD Candidate in Information Studies, UCLA
Stacy Wood is a PhD candidate in Information Studies at UCLA. Her dissertation, Making Secret(s) examines the infrastructure supporting classified information in the United States. She is a critical scholar of archives and information policy focusing on the legal and cultural lives of records and their attendant technological assemblages. She also holds an MLIS from UCLA.


Thursday March 30, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

11:45am

Session 9: PDA and Memory
Interconnectedness: personal memory-making on YouTube (Leisa Gibbons, Kent State University)

Remembering Names from Emails: Cognitive Experiments with Life-Logs (CELL): A Novel Approach to Study Name Retrieval (Sudheendra Hangal & Abhilasha Kumar, Ashoka University)

Digital Space in the Personal Archive: A Focus on Screenshots (Frances Corry, University of Southern California)

Presentation Details: 

  • Interconnectedness: personal memory-making on YouTube (Leisa Gibbons, Kent State University)

    Drawing from Sue McKemmish’s 1996 paper on the relationship personal memory-making has to societal memory, and Robert Ghel’s 2009 discussion of YouTube as an archive awaiting a curator, this paper presents findings from a research project on ‘small stories’ and their role as evidence of culture. Small stories are the individual interactions and use of YouTube as a personal memory-making space. Findings from the case study research highlighted that small stories deliver a unique richness and insight into processes of how identity, memory, narrative and technologies are constructed and valued as part of online interaction. This challenges the notion that parts of YouTube video, such as a single video, or a page of content, can adequately represent evidence of culture. Ultimately, the research raises questions about what conceptual, practical and ethical role institutions of memory have in online participatory spaces and how personal use of online technologies can be preserved as evidence.

  • Remembering Names from Emails: Cognitive Experiments with Life-Logs (CELL): A Novel Approach to Study Name Retrieval (Sudheendra Hangal & Abhilasha Kumar, Ashoka University)

    Everyone relates to the experience of forgetting names of familiar people. The ability to recall names in everyday life contexts decreases with age and with degenerative brain disease, but the mechanisms of this decline are not well understood. Cognitive Experiments with Life-Logs (CELL) is a scalable new approach to measure recall of personally familiar names using computerized text-based analysis of email archives. Emails are personal digital archives of time-stamped, personally relevant information, which can be leveraged to study memory processes and proper name retrieval. CELL’s algorithm identifies potentially memorable sentences from people’s sent emails and presents them as stimuli in a name retrieval task, to study familiar name recall in a naturalistic setting. In this paradigm, 44 participants viewed sentences automatically drawn from a year of their sent email, and recalled the name of the email recipient to whom the email was sent. Regression analyses revealed that accuracy in familiar name recall declined with the age of the email, but increased with greater frequency of interaction with the person. An additional finding was that participants remembered the specific month of the email, even when they forgot the name of the email recipient, suggesting that the recall of familiar names varies across contexts. These findings suggest that CELL can be applied as an ecologically valid web-based measure to study name retrieval using existing digital life-logs among large populations.

  • Digital Space in the Personal Archive: A Focus on Screenshots (Frances Corry, University of Southern California)

    This preentation takes up the screenshot as a flexible, user-friendly tool to save digital space. A built-in feature on most smartphones, tablets, and computers today, the tool enables users to “photograph” what rests on the surface of their screens, saving those visual elements as an image file on the home device. Crucially, the screenshot can easily prepare digital space–from a chat conversation to a social media profile, a computer desktop to a web page–to be saved and organized in a user’s larger digital archive.

    In this talk, the screenshot is first contextualized in greater discussions of digital archiving by considering its inclusion in web archiving tools like Perma.cc, which uses web page screenshots to counteract link rot (“Perma.cc User Guide,” 2016). Unlike these more specialized archiving services, however, the screenshot is proffered as a saving tool for lay users, quite literally at the fingertips of many who use computers, tablets, and smartphones. Furthermore, not only is it widely available, it is a tool already widely used to document a range of digital spaces (Thompson, 2015). These affordances are contrasted with its shortcomings, including lossyness and the redaction of interactive elements in the digital space. Despite these drawbacks, the screenshot is put forth as a valuable tool worthy of further attention in digital archival contexts. The talk briefly concludes by addressing the importance of both public and private digital spaces as sites of personal memory, emphasizing the reasons why users may want to use and save screenshots in a personal digital archive. 

Moderators
avatar for Wendy Hagenmaier

Wendy Hagenmaier

Digital Collections Archivist, Georgia Institute of Technology
Wendy Hagenmaier is the Digital Collections Archivist at Georgia Tech, where she develops policies and workflows for digital preservation and access. She is President of the Society of Georgia Archivists and a member of SAA's Committee on Public Policy.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Corry

Frances Corry

University of Southern California
Frances Corry is a doctoral student in communication and Annenberg fellow at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Her research addresses the histories of digital spaces, with a focus on the technologies used to construct these narratives.
avatar for Leisa Gibbons

Leisa Gibbons

Assistant Professor, Kent State University
Leisa Gibbons is an Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University. Leisa's primary research interests concern how technologies used in personal and community memory-making contribute to the formation of shared cultural heritage. | | | | Leisa has a PhD and Masters in Information Management & Systems from Monash University, and a Bachelor of Arts from University of Western Australia. She... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Abhilasha Kumar

Abhilasha Kumar

Ashoka University and Washington University, St. Louis
Abhilasha Kumar is a Ph.D. student in Psychological & Brain Sciences at Washington University, St. Louis. She has previously completed her Masters in Liberal Studies at Ashoka University in India, and Masters in Mathematics from IIT, Delhi.


Thursday March 30, 2017 11:45am - 12:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

12:30pm

Lunch
There are several lunch options within walking distance to Lathrop Library. Perhaps the closest, which offers a variety of lunch options, is Arbuckle Dining Pavilion, at the Graduate School of Business.

 

Thursday March 30, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Arbuckle Dining Pavilion Stanford Graduate School of Business, 655 Knight Way, Stanford, CA 94305

2:00pm

Session 10: Engaging Communities in PDA 1
Introducing a Mobile App for Uploading Family Treasures to Public Library Collections (Natalie Milbrodt, Queens Public Library)

The Memory Lab (Russell Martin, District of Columbia Public Library)

The Archive-O-Matic and the Emulation Time Machine: Personal Archiving On The Move (Wendy Hagenmaier, Georgia Tech)

The Great Migration (Jasmyn Castro, Smithsonian NMAAHC)

Presentation Details:

  • Introducing a Mobile App for Uploading Family Treasures to Public Library Collections (Natalie Milbrodt, Queens Public Library)

    The Queens Public Library in New York City has developed a free mobile application for uploading scanned items, digital photos, oral history interviews and “wild sound” recordings of Queens neighborhoods for permanent safekeeping in the library’s archival collections.  It allows families to add their personal histories to the larger historical narrative of their city and their country.  The upload tool is an open source iOS and Android app built using Appcelerator to accept submissions of the crowd-sourced metadata, audio and visual files.  It automatically generates a Dublin Core catalog record in the library’s digital asset management system that metadata librarians can review, edit, and set live on the library’s digital archives website and then harvest to the Digital Public Library of America.  The tool is part of the programmatic and technological offerings of the library’s Queens Memory program, whose mission is to capture contemporary history in Queens.

    The team’s development roadmap emphasizes making this tool configurable for other organizations who wish to adapt it for their own use.  Queens Memory Director, Natalie Milbrodt, will share the library’s approach and lessons learned during development and early user testing of the beta version in late 2016/early 2017.

  • The Memory Lab (Russell Martin, District of Columbia Public Library)

    The Memory Lab at District of Columbia Public Library is a do-it-yourself personal archiving space where the public can digitize outdated forms of media, such as VHS, VHS-C, mini DVs, audio cassettes, photos, slides, negatives and floppy disks.  The Lab also hosts classes on PDA concepts such as Downloading Your Facebook Archive, Intro to Personal Digital Archiving, and Digital Estate Planning. Through the lab's libguide: http://libguides.dclibrary.org/memorylab , it is also a resource for the public and other institutions on best practices in PDA and how to put together your own Memory Lab.

    This presentation consists of how the Memory Lab was developed by a fellow from the Library of Congress' National Digital Stewardship Residency, budget for the lab, equipment used and how it is put together, training for staff and the public, as well as success stories and lessons learned.


  • The Archive-O-Matic and the Emulation Time Machine: Personal Archiving On The Move (Wendy Hagenmaier, Georgia Tech)

    retroTECH (http://retrotech.library.gatech.edu/) is a Georgia Tech Library program in which the campus community can create the future by exploring the past. With the emerging retroTECH Lab as a home base, students, faculty, staff, alumni, researchers, and community partners engage in hands-on research, DIY peer-to-peer digital archiving, experiential learning, and outreach around the evolution of technology.

    The vision for the retroTECH Lab entails a highly curated combination of classic, vintage hardware and software and modern tools for digital archiving and emulation, all designed to be accessed and used. retroTECH aims to inspire a cultural mindset that emphasizes the importance of personal archives, open access to digital heritage, and long-term thinking.

    The Pilot Lab opened in the Georgia Tech Library in August 2015. A team of archivists, librarians, and campus community partners are prototyping services and programs to be implemented in the retroTECH Lab’s permanent home in the redesigned Library building around 2018.

    In order to meet users where they are, expand retroTECH’s audience, and introduce users to emerging tools for personal digital archiving, we are designing two mobile lab carts, which will travel around campus and into the community beyond. The Emulation Time Machine cart will offer users a chance to interact with a variety of emulated environments, and the Archive-O-Matic will provide hardware and software for recovering personal archives from obsolete media. Our presentation will outline the user research process our team conducted (with the assistance of a stellar group of Georgia Tech students) to inform the design of the carts, offer an overview of the carts’ features and use cases, and reflect on where retroTECH’s personal digital archiving services are headed. By sharing our work in progress, we hope to make connections with related projects and inspire others to consider the possibilities of mobile personal digital archiving.

    The retroTECH Team brings together diverse perspectives and expertise from across the Library. We are: Isabel Altamirano, Liaison Librarian for three engineering majors, plus Chemistry & Biochemistry; Erin Edmond, GT 1000 Library Liaison & Public Services Associate; Wendy Hagenmaier, Digital Collections Archivist; Heidi Lowe, IT Support Professional; Miles Raphael, Graduate Student in Computer Science; Jody Thompson, Head of Archives; Alison Valk, Multimedia Instruction Librarian & Subject Librarian for College of Computing.

  • The Great Migration (Jasmyn Castro, Smithsonian NMAAHC

    The Great Migration is a public program initiated by the media preservation department of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC. This public program will invite visitors to bring their home movies into the museum and have them inspected and digitally scanned by NMAAHC staff. The program will not only highlight our ongoing film preservation efforts at the museum, but also open up the door to a broader conversation surrounding the often marginalized histories that exist within the African American community. Even though home movies were traditionally created for the entertainment of family and friends, and never intended for public audiences, today they can serve as an invaluable historical resource that helps us reexamine and understand the transformation of race and ethnicity in America over the years. Through our efforts, we hope to expose the public to the various experiences of the African American community, while simultaneously communicating how these experiences contribute to American history overall. This proposed presentation will provide an overview of the planning that went into making this program possible, the hurdles faced by the NMAAHC staff, the February 2017 unveiling of The Great Migration, and everything we learned along the way.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Gengenbach

Martin Gengenbach

Assistant Archivist, Gates Archive
Marty Gengenbach is an Assistant Archivist at the Gates Archive in Seattle, WA. | | Marty holds an MSLS with a concentration in Archives and Records Management from the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Speakers
avatar for Jasmyn R. Castro

Jasmyn R. Castro

Film Conservation & Digitization Associate, Smithsonian NMAAHC
Jasmyn R. Castro is a Film Conservation and Digitization Associate at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture. She earned her M.A. in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and her B.A. in Film & Women's Studies from SUNY Empire State College. In 2015, Jasmyn created the African American Home Movie Archive (www.aahma.org); an online aggregate of... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Hagenmaier

Wendy Hagenmaier

Digital Collections Archivist, Georgia Institute of Technology
Wendy Hagenmaier is the Digital Collections Archivist at Georgia Tech, where she develops policies and workflows for digital preservation and access. She is President of the Society of Georgia Archivists and a member of SAA's Committee on Public Policy.
RM

Russell Martin

Labs Librarian, District of Columbia Public Library
My name is Russell Martin and I am a librarian with The Labs at District of Columbia Public Library. I have worked for DCPL in various positions for 6 years and received my MSLS from Catholic University in 2013. I am interested in special collections, and preservation of both physical and born digital items.
avatar for Natalie Milbrodt

Natalie Milbrodt

Associate Coordinator, Metadata Services, Queens Public Library
Natalie Milbrodt leads Queens Library'€™s Metadata Services division, responsible for the system's cataloging and digitization efforts. In 2010, Milbrodt developed the Queens Memory program on behalf of Queens College, CUNY and Queens Library. Queens Memory collects oral histories, photographs and other mementos from residents at public events and exhibits them alongside selections from the library'€™s archives on the project'€™s website... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

3:00pm

Session 11: Engaging Communities in PDA 2
Citizen archive and extended MyData principles (Mikko Lampi, Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences)

Born Digital 2016: Collecting for the Future (Sarah Slade, State Library Victoria)

Whose History? (Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate, University of Denver)

Presentation Details:

  • Citizen archive and extended MyData principles (Mikko Lampi, Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences)

    Digitalia – Research Center on Digital Information Management – is developing a professional-quality digital archiving solution available for common people. The Citizen archive relies on an open-source platform allowing users to manage their personal data and ensure access to it on a long-term basis. The solution is on an early pilot phase and based on previously developed and enhanced OSA (Open Source Archive) platform. The motivation for the development work is preserving the valuable digital heritage by ordinary citizens and family archivists – in other words, “keeping their found things found” and capturing that part of  the digital footprint they consider worth preserving. In general, such archive strengthens the civil society, digital rights, and information transparency.

    MyData refers to personal data which complies with the principles of human-centric management and use. MyData paradigm is connected with personal archiving by managing coherent descriptive metadata and access rights, while also ensuring privacy and usefulness. People have the right to obtain personal data, use it freely, and to share, donate or sell personal data to third parties. However, from the Citizen archive point of view, MyData is rather CommunityData – containing information that links various users together. The data is produced and used by the small community, such as in the case of family archives.

    The Citizen Archive is more than just a digital storage such as cloud drives. Most importantly, it relies on the above-listed MyData principles. Users may determine whether they preserve the materials for a specific time period or permanently. They can grant access rights to family members, relatives and researchers. They also have easy-to-use searching and browsing facilities. Finally, users may collectively enrich information by describing the stories behind the archived content.

  • Born Digital 2016: Collecting for the Future (Sarah Slade, State Library Victoria)

    This presentation is about Born Digital 2016: collecting for the future a week-long national media and communications campaign to raise public awareness of digital archiving and preservation and why it matters to individuals, communities and organizations.

    An initiative of the National & State Libraries of Australasia (NSLA) Digital Preservation Group, Born Digital 2016 was designed around five themes — one for each day of the campaign. These were: Science & Space, Indigenous Voices, Truth & History, Digital Lifestyles, and Play. These themes were chosen to engage a range of community sectors and ages. Each provided a different focus for public thinking about the importance of digital collecting, preservation and access: from personal digital archiving to organizational approaches. A professionally-produced video featuring a topic expert — including scientists, journalists, social commentators, media personalities and gamers — was created for each theme.

    The campaign used the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web launch (6 August 2016) to maximize media exposure. The daily theme enabled engagement with national and local audiences through traditional and social media, and provided a focus for individual library events.

    Social media was used to promote the Born Digital videos, events and related content. It was also used to highlight media coverage, including appearances on Australia Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) News Breakfast and State Library Victoria (SLV)’s digital time capsule burial.

    As well as Facebook posts and Tweets published by the NSLA libraries, the #BornDigital2016 hashtag was embraced by people attending on-site events, and reacting to the videos and other content. It was also taken up by several public and university libraries, and high profile organisations, exposing the campaign to a broader audience. The campaign successfully engaged traditional television and print media, and online news outlets, to increase public awareness of what digital archiving and preservation is and why it is important.

  • Whose History? (Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate, University of Denver)

    This talk will discuss macro appraisal and documenting intersectionality within the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, where it went wrong, possible solutions to documenting intersectionality in activism, and will introduce the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project. 

Moderators
avatar for Mary Kidd

Mary Kidd

Systems and Operations Coordinator, New York Public Library
Mary currently works at New York Public Library’s Special Collections Division as their Systems and Operations Coordinator. Prior to this, she was a National Digital Stewardship Resident at New York Public Radio. She is a member of the XFR Collective, a non-profit organization that partners with artists, activists, individuals, and groups to lower the barriers to preserving at-risk audiovisual media.

Speakers
avatar for Mikko Lampi

Mikko Lampi

Research Manager, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Mikko Lampi is a research manager in Digital Economy at South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences. Mikko has a B.Eng. in information technology and studies in information systems science, business economics and cognitive science at University of Jyväskylä. He is interested in making better digital products, services and experiences with software, data and design. Furthermore, his interests include research and development connected... Read More →
SS

Sarah Slade

Sarah Slade is Head of Digital Engagement & Collection Services at State Library Victoria (SLV). Sarah has worked at SLV for the past 11 years, after working for a range of organisations including Artlab Australia, Scottish Museums Council, International Conservation Services, Australian National Maritime Museum and her own consultancy. Her background is in conservation and collection management, more recently she has focussed on aspects of... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.


Thursday March 30, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:00pm

Break
Enjoy coffee and light pastries while you view demonstrations and posters. 

Thursday March 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:00pm

Posters 1
  • From Scrapbooks to Apps: Lifelogging Data and its Place in Personal Archiving (Leanna Barcelona).

    Lifelogging, the practice of tracking personal data generated by our behaviors and movements, has become increasingly popular with the development of technology. Devices, websites, and apps allow individuals to track their daily lives in an innovative way. While scrapbooking is not a lost art, people are progressively using technology to create an archive of their personal memories. This poster looks at the use of two different types of lifelogging technologies, FitBit and Exist, and analyzes the benefits and drawbacks they exhibit. It will also explore the future lifelogging data has within the personal archiving world. Future generations may look to this data to better understand today’s populations. Rather than opening your great-grandmother’s scrapbook, you may be opening an excel file of data explaining every step she ever took. With the growth in lifelogging and the Quantified Self Movement, it is important for professionals and researchers to understand how this will affect a historically paper-dominant field. Through this poster, I hope to establish a better understanding of how technology is changing current practices in personal archiving and its usage by others.
     
  • Making Data Management Manageable: A Risk Analysis Activity for Managing Research Data (Elise Dunham, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

    Funders, libraries, and journals are emphasizing the importance of research data management to sound academic research. Many hear about the challenges associated with haphazard data management, which are, at their core, personal information management challenges, and some already face these challenges themselves. Even though many researchers fundamentally understand that practices like naming files consistently, backing up hard drives, and writing documentation about research processes are crucial to the success of their work, they tend to consider the task of data management to be daunting and all-too time-consuming. Seeing a need from local researchers for implementable solutions to managing research data, the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing practical data management exercises that are of use to all campus researchers. One outcome of these efforts is a risk analysis activity that encourages researchers to think about the risks associated with unmanaged data. The goal of this activity is for researchers to feel empowered to prioritize their data management activities and motivated to tackle data management in focused phases. In this poster, I introduce the risk analysis activity, demonstrating risk management concepts and highlighting its applicability to other managing other types of information management. The goal of this poster is to inspire those working across a variety of domains to put risk analysis concepts to work in other types of personal information management efforts. As the amount of personal information increases at seemingly insurmountable rates, the need for practical, easy-to-digest methods to prioritize time, money, and energy when managing personal information will remain.

  • Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations (Nataliya Tyshkevich, Higher School of Economics, National Research University, Moscow). [CANCELED]

    The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. The Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 

  • Name that File! An Active Learning Approach to Promoting Thoughtful Filenaming Practices in Personal Digital Archives (Mary Wahl, California State University, Northridge).

    While developing filenaming schemes can be a mundane activity, sometimes the long-term usability and findability of personal digital assets depends solely on the mere naming of files. So how might personal digital archives (PDA) instructors teach the importance of filenaming strategies in an engaging manner? “Name That File” is a brief (approximately 15 minute) group activity that PDA instructors can use to teach filenaming concepts such as description and choosing data elements by which to organize by. Using everyday-use items like printed photos and manila folders to stand in for abstract notions like computer files and directories, the activity aims to promote a more engaged thoughtfulness to how one organizes and names their personal digital assets. This poster will describe the components and learning objectives for the "Name That File" activity that can be included in personal digital archiving workshops and other related programming. 

  •  Analyzing personal email with ePADD (Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan, Josh Schneider, Stanford University; Sudheendra Hangal, Ashoka University).

    ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that allows individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing, named entity recognition, and other algorithmic processes. This poster will present the software in the context of personal digital archiving.

Speakers
avatar for Leanna Barcelona

Leanna Barcelona

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois
Leanna Barcelona is a current graduate student at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is working towards certification in Special Collections and intends to graduate in May 2017. Leanna has worked at the University Archives for over two years, starting as a student assistant while completing her undergraduate work and then becoming a graduate assistant while completing her masters. In her role at... Read More →
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Elise Dunham

Elise Dunham

Data Curation Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist at the University of Illinois, integrally involved with the launch of the Illinois Data Bank. Dunham has a background in archives and a current focus on privacy, sensitive data, and appraisal in the context of research data.
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Head of Technical Services, Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
The Head of Technical Services division in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives oversees the acquisition of incoming collections - we take in an average of 1,800 linear feet - or 2.5 million documents - a year. This means that I direct the accessioning, cataloging and processing of incoming material in any format - from papyrus fragments to artifacts and computer media. I plan and direct special large... Read More →
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Mary Wahl

Mary Wahl

Digital Services Librarian, California State University, Northridge
Mary Wahl is Digital Services Librarian at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she works with metadata, cataloging and streaming media projects. Her interests lie in taking best practices of digital collections management and communicating them in ways that can be applied to everyday life via personal digital archiving workshops around her local community. When not nitpicking over filenaming schemes, Mary enjoys writing... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:00pm

Posters 2
  • Women’s March on Washington Archives Project (Katrina Vandeven)

    This poster presents the methods by which the Women’s March on Washington Archives Project collected and preserved materials and oral histories from the Women’s Marches on January 21st, 2017. It will particularly highlight the methods by which a large scale oral history collection was implemented nationwide and globally within one month, the triumphs and failures of the project, and the author’s reflection of the project’s creation and implementation. 

    Author: Katrina Vandeven, MLIS Candidate University of Denver, Co-Founder Women's March on Washington Archives Project. Collaborator: Danielle Russell, Archives Assistant at the Southern Maryland Studies Center, Co-Founder of Women's March on Washington Archives Project.

  • Photos Die Podcast (Todd Wemer, Endicott College)

    In my recent dissertation, which theoretically explores personal photography, memory, and concepts of the archive, I included an online audio component, in the form of a voicemail number that people could call to tell stories about lost and/or found photographs. These little audio gems in many ways have become the most important “results” of my completed dissertation (May 2016). Over the course of my fall sabbatical (2016) I’ve been recording audio stories, interviewing people, re-interviewing research subjects, planning a sound rich podcast based on many of the themes I covered in my dissertation.

    Photos Die will be a narrative driven podcast based on the stories we tell about photographs and the photographs we use to tell our stories. The end result I hope to be equally pleasing to a listener of story driven podcasts, as well as scholars interested in personal archives.

  • Preserving precious emails - citizen archive (Anssi Jääskeläinen)

    Inside “secure” shoe boxes at the attic, written on floppy disks or scratched CD-ROMs, laying on the hard drive. This is how old family archives have been made.  To make things more difficult, during the past few decades the playground of the archival masters has grown to include e-mails, online communities and social media as well, in other words, family archives are distributed. When the archival masters are passing away, many of these precious archives are doomed, not necessarily due to ignorance, but due to obsolescence. Naturally there are lots of other reasons, but this paper focuses on how to manage the obsolescence in the case of e-mails.

    The national archives have their preferred and acceptable formats for preserving e-mails. However, these formats such as .pst are software dependent and therefore not easily viewable on other devices or products. Further on, the fonts, image placements, etc. aspects of the e-mail might change between e-mail viewers and this is not acceptable for archival content. Thirdly, does an average citizen know what to do with a file that for example ends with .ost? Finally, there are ways to save e-mails directly into an archival format. However, it is principally wrong to obligate the ordinary citizen to handle this task.

    The presented solution is a fully automated conversion from a proprietary e-mail format (Outlook .pst or .ost) into validated PDF/A-3b files which includes every metadata field that the original e-mail item had. Our approach of handling email data files is fully based on utilizing existing open source products which are bound together with the combination of Python and Java. We have implemented some steps in the workflow in order to get the data conversion completely processed. When integrated with the citizen archive solution, the archived e-mails are preserved, available, searchable and accessible.

  • From Big Data to Personal Data: The Next Generation of Digital Management (Lee Boulie, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum)

    With the increased ease of creating and storing personal data, staying organized in the face of deluge is becoming a necessary and vital skillset for anyone dealing with files in the workplace or seeking to capture their personal content history for future generations. This poster will focus on lessons learned from managing a museum’s 2.5 million item collection of moving images, photos, print, and audio/music materials; and applying that insight to personal data curation, long term access, and preservation. Best practices for prioritizing content, applying file naming conventions, file hierarchy maintenance, storage selection, dealing with information overload and keeping information secure will be presented. This poster will share a solid understanding of the principles, best practices and types of software systems currently in play in the professional Digital Asset Management field.

  • Saveit.Photo (Júlia Pontés)

    Until the Millennial generation the concept of personal and family photographic archive consisted of the album making, negative saving and professional development and printing. The photographs were physical objects that, with proper conservation practices, could last for more than a century. During the past 10-12 years a transition started to take place and that redefined the way our personal history and imagery is made and stored.

    Many of the photographs taken with early digital camera back from the mid 2000’s are barely readable. Nevertheless, whoever made prints are at least ahead as the prints can be scanned. Those who kept their imagery on CD’s, that is very sensitive to scratches, mold high temperatures, might not be able to reach their data.

    A 2015 Info Trends survey forecasted that 1.3 trillion images will be taken in 2017. In 2010, this number was 0.35 trillion, and 60% of them were taken with actual cameras. Now this number might be as low as 13%.

    Families are taken many photos, much more than it could ever be conceived only 15 years ago. And, even though moments are being recorded more than ever, those files might not be accessible for the following family generation. Museums, Libraries and Archives have long been thinking about digital conservation and developing strong methodologies for that. Nevertheless, they are often kept to a limited group, not making part of the general collective knowledge, thought  or practice.

    Starting to look at digital imagery and data as perishable items and creating easy proactive conservation and archiving methods may be the key for long term personal “memorabilia” access for families.

    I am currently using the knowledge I acquired as a digital and analogue photographer, a professional printer and photographic asset manager to develop “Saveit.photos” which consist of creating a conservation dialogue among non professional image makers and teaching and playing simplified techniques to help individuals, families and even professional photographers to rethink their archives and make them accessible for a longer period of time.

Speakers
LB

Lee Boulie

Director of Digital and Library Collections, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Lee Boulie, Director of Digital and Library Collections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Boulie received her MLIS in 2007, and in her tenth year serving as a degreed professional librarian focusing primarily on collection care, digitization and digital information access software systems, equipment and hardware infrastructure, she has been working in various capacities of information services for over 15 years. Having previously... Read More →
avatar for Anssi Jääskeläinen

Anssi Jääskeläinen

R&D, South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
Anssi Jääskeläinen has an IT MSc. (2005) from Lappeenranta University of Technology and a PhD (2011) from the same university. He has an extensive knowledge of user experience and usability. His current interests are in format migration, open source development and virtualization.
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →
KV

Katrina Vandeven

MLIS Candidate, University of Denver
I am the co-founder of the Women's March on Washington Archives Project, and the founder of the Documenting Denver Activism Archives Project.
TW

Todd Wemmer

Todd Wemmer first became involved with audio-storytelling while using voicemail as a research method to collect stories about lost-and-found personal photographs (lostandfoundphotos.org). Another recent project (Withcameras.com) combines collaborative audio narration with vintage snapshots of women using cameras.  Todd’s research often as combined audio and the visual world.      Todd’s current work includes a... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:05pm

Demonstration 5: Publishat
 Publishat: Personal Lifecycle Management Tool

We designed “Publishat” based on personal data as a paradigm. We developed a framework for managing personal data for a lifetime. We organised personal data into 6 major areas: Academics, Personal, Professional, Health, Financial and Legal.  There is another dimension, Communication, which is mandatory for all the major areas. The content is created using the Personal Lifecycle Management framework, is context-based, and is therefore effective in aiding decision making.


Speakers
avatar for Suresh Jagarlamudi

Suresh Jagarlamudi

CEO, Publishat
Suresh did MS (by Research) from IIT Madras, Chennai on Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems implementation in Indian Industry. He is working as CEO at iPublish Advanced Technology Solutions (iPublish ATS). A Solution Architect for Personal Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems – www.publishat.com (Android and iOS apps are available on app stores) and a job portal www.wikijobs.co.in. | | He is a Certified PMP from Project... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:05pm - 4:25pm
Lathrop 290 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:05pm

Demonstration 6: Prozhito [CANCELED]
Prozhito: Private Diaries Database as a Key to the Family History Through Generations

The purpose of the publisher in a digital era is to follow the principles of correct transmission of all the features of the historical source. At the same time work with texts from family collections needs to strike a balance between personal and public to avoid publishing the information that could possibly compromise third parties. This is one of the most difficult tasks of private archives publishing, the key to which can only be found in close cooperation with the heirs and administrators of family archives. We offer some solutions to these problems within the « Prozhito» (prozhito.org) – the first global database of 400 diverse non-authorized private diaries (150,000 entries), tied to a chronological line, representing personal narratives from the XIX-XX centuries in Russian and Ukrainian. “Prozhito“ blends the structural experience of blog platforms and archival tradition of curating personal writings. User can work not only with particular texts but with the whole collection of diary entries, building complex search queries by author’s gender and age, journal types (f.e, war, tourist, dream etc.) and filtering results by exact dates and places of records. In Prozhito the manuscript owners (person or family) continue to participate in its preparation for publication and control the text on all the steps of its transformation from the manuscript to the machine-readable database unit. They have the right to exclude fragments, considered unappropriate due to ethical reasons. Working with a family history often activates intrafamily communication, but the information, stored in the family archives, is of interest not only for the family members. Prozhito project allows any user to explore the diaries data and gives huge research material for researchers of everyday life. 


Speakers
avatar for Nataliya Tyshkevich

Nataliya Tyshkevich

Digital Humanities Center Coordinator, Higher School of Economics
Nataliya is a computational linguist, graduated from the NRU HSE, Moscow, participant of research group on social network analysis of Russian drama, and active member and coordinator of the Digital Humanities Center at NRU HSE (hum.hse.ru/digital). Academic interests include literary social network analysis, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices. She is currently working as a computational linguist and a special projects... Read More →


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:05pm - 4:25pm
Lathrop 292 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:05pm

Demonstration 7: Kumbu
Save digital memories online with Kumbu

Kumbu is a digital souvenir box service. Today, all our personal memories are digital. We own and produce way too much data. We never clean up. Kumbu is a service to help preserve your favorite digital memories. It can be pictures & videos, but also natively digital content, such as cherished emails, posts and comments on social networks, your favorite blogposts, your greatest food recipes, your music playlists and more. It allows anyone with a computer to gather every part of their digital footprint in a single place. We’ve been building Kumbu for the past year, and I’ll be happy to show it you, as well as exchange on what we’ve learned in the process about how people feel, and act with their Personal Digital Archives. It will also be an opportunity to reflect and share some of the challenges of building a private, secure online service for personal data.

Speakers
avatar for Ziad Wakim

Ziad Wakim

CEO, Kumbu
Ziad WAKIM is the founder of Kumbu. After 15 years building enterprise information management systems, initially for libraries, then archives and enterprises, he founded Kumbu to provide individuals with tools to preserve, enjoy and share their personal digital archives, in a secure and private manner. He currently lives in Paris, France.


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:05pm - 4:25pm
Lathrop 294 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:05pm

Demonstration 8: Webrecorder
Webrecorder

Webrecorder is a free online tool that allows users to create their own high-fidelity archives of the dynamic web. Current digital preservation solutions involve complex, automated processes that were designed for a web made up of relatively static documents. Webrecorder, in contrast, can capture social media and other dynamic content, such as embedded video and complex javascript, while putting the user at the center of the archiving process. 


Speakers
IK

Ilya Kremer

Webrecorder
Lead developer of Webrecorder, Rhizome.org


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:05pm - 4:25pm
Lathrop 296 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:30pm

Session 12: PDA: Retrospect and Prospect (Panel)

Over the past decade, broad public understanding of an appreciation for personal digital archiving has increased in surprising ways. Facebook’s Timeline is in use by nearly 2 billion monthly users, Prince’s digital archive recently went on the market for $35 million, billions of smart phones have been put into to use to record daily experience, and concern about the future of personal digital belongings has become a staple of mainstream news reporting.

This discussion between early observers and practitioners of personal digital archiving will look back on the last decade, and forward to the next, covering changing social norms about what is saved, why, who can view it, and how; legal structures, intellectual property rights, and digital executorships; institutional practices, particularly in library and academic settings, but also in the form of new services to the public; market offerings from both established and emerging companies; and technological developments that will allow (or limit) the practice of personal archiving.

Moderators
CM

Cathy Marshall

Adjunct Professor, Center for the Study of Digital Libraries, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Texas A&M University

Speakers
HB

Howard Besser

Professor of Cinema Studies and Associate Director of New York University's Moving Image Archiving & Preservation Program(MIAP, NYU
Howard Besser is Professor of Cinema Studies and Associate Director of New York University's Moving Image Archiving & Preservation Program(MIAP), as well as Senior Scientist for Digital Library Initiatives for NYU's Library. In addition to teaching MIAP courses, he teaches regular Cinema Studies courses on New Media, Installation Art, and the Future of Cinema and Free Culture & Open Access. His research projects at NYU have involved preserving... Read More →
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →
JU

jeff ubois

Jeff Ubois serves on the board of the Kahle/Austin Foundation, a San Francisco-based philanthropic organization devoted to digital preservation. Prior to this, Jeff was a consultant to archives, museums, broadcasters, and commercial organizations in the U.S. and E.U. engaged in mass digitization and technical innovation, and an early convener of the Personal Digital Archiving conference.


Thursday March 30, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

5:30pm

Closing Remarks
Closing remarks from the PDA 2017 Planning Committee.

Thursday March 30, 2017 5:30pm - 5:45pm
Bishop Auditorium Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305
 
Friday, March 31
 

9:00am

Archiving Born Digital Audio and Video Collections (Workshop)
Registration is limited; in order to attend you must both register for PDA 2017 and also register for this workshop via the conference registration page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/personal-digital-archiving-pda-2017-tickets-28669844276.

About the Workshop

Digital audio and video permeate every aspect of our social experience - capturing familial memories, communicating news, documenting civil rights abuses, and weaponizing political campaigns. To many individuals, archiving is a mystery. To many organizations, it is a challenge. Born digital audiovisual collections are increasingly at risk of loss due to rapid format obsolescence, proliferation of content without sufficient preservation planning, and popular software-as-a-service archiving models limiting the public's knowledge and participation in the archiving process. 

Three fundamental questions will be addressed: What constitutes an archive of born digital AV? How can a person or small organization curate and steward a born digital AV collection for preservation and access? How can archiving born digital AV be practical, efficient, and cost-effective? The workshop curriculum will include characteristics of born digital AV, how methods of generating born digital AV influence archiving, efficient and practical digital tools, preservation strategies for retention and access, and ethics and privacy. 

Tools and services that will be covered or referenced include but are not limited to VLC, QuickTime, iTunes, Windows Media Player, MediaInfo, Handbrake, MPEG Streamclip, FFMPEG, Adobe Media Encoder, Exact Audio Copy, VOB2mpeg, Guymager, Forensic Toolkit, IsoBuster, Toast, cloud-based archiving services, and online video platforms for access. 

Instructors will support Mac/PC attendees.


About the Presenters 
 

Stefan Elnabli is UC San Diego Library's Media Curation Librarian and digital reformatting operations supervisor, providing strategic direction in the Library's development, management, and preservation of moving image collections. Elnabli's engagement with visual culture spans the areas of cinema studies, archival preservation, and film programming/projection. His past appointments include positions with WNET Channel 13 Digital Archive, Anthology Film Archives, Doc Films at the University of Chicago, and preservation units within major university libraries including New York University, Stanford University, and Northwestern University. Elnabli holds an MA in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University.

Annalise Berdini is UC San Diego Library’s Digital Archivist, providing library-wide expertise on workflows, tools, and best practices to support the management and preservation of born-digital content. She previously served as Manuscripts/Archives Processor for Special Collections and Archives at UCSD, Project Assistant and Processor for the PACSCL/CLIR Hidden Collections Project in Philadelphia, and worked on the Z. Taylor Vinson Collection at Hagley Museum and Library.


Speakers
AB

Annalise Berdini

UC San Diego Library
Annalise Berdini is UC San Diego Library’s Digital Archivist, providing library-wide expertise on workflows, tools, and best practices to support the management and preservation of born-digital content. She previously served as Manuscripts/Archives Processor for Special Collections and Archives at UCSD, Project Assistant and Processor for the PACSCL/CLIR Hidden Collections Project in Philadelphia, and worked on the Z. Taylor Vinson... Read More →
SE

Stefan Elnabli

Media Curation Librarian, University of California, San Diego
Stefan Elnabli is UC San Diego Library's Media Curation Librarian and digital reformatting operations supervisor, providing strategic direction in the Library's development, management, and preservation of moving image collections. Elnabli's engagement with visual culture spans the areas of cinema studies, archival preservation, and film programming/projection. His past appointments include positions with WNET Channel 13 Digital Archive... Read More →


Friday March 31, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lathrop 290 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

9:00am

ePADD (Workshop)
Registration is limited; in order to attend you must both register for PDA 2017 and also register for this workshop via the conference registration page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/personal-digital-archiving-pda-2017-tickets-28669844276.

About the Workshop

ePADD is an open source and freely available software package, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that supports the ability of individuals and institutions to analyze and evaluate email of potential historical or cultural value. The software primarily accomplishes these tasks by incorporating techniques from computer science, including the fields of natural language processing and named entity recognition. The software also supports the creation and use of customizable lexicons, attachment browsing, regular expression search, and other related features.

This workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and experience to use ePADD to analyze and evaluate personal email archives, including their own email. The workshop will include discussion on overcoming potential implementation challenges, as well as opportunities to participate in ePADD‘s development. 

Peter Chan (ePADD Project Manager, Digital Archivist, Stanford University) and Josh Schneider (ePADD Community Manager, Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University) will co-lead the workshop, orienting participants to the software, demoing its capabilities, and taking participants through the steps of using ePADD to analyze and evaluate personal email archives. A reading list and agenda will be distributed to participants in advance of the workshop. 

Attendees will need to bring a laptop meeting the following minimum specifications (which may be updated prior to the workshop):

OS: Windows 7 SP1 / 10, Mac OS X 10.10 / 10.11
Memory: 4096 MB minimum (2048 MB RAM allocated to the application by default)
Browser: Chrome 50/51, Firefox 47/48 
Windows installations: Java Runtime Environment 8u101 or later required. 

Please note that attendees will also need administrative privileges for their machine to be able to run the software. Flash drives containing the latest ePADD release, as well as a test email archive, will be provided by the presenters.

About the Presenters

Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Project Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives. 

Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, where he acquires and provides access to Stanford University records, faculty papers, and collections documenting campus and student life. He is also Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives. He is an advisory board member of BitCurator NLP, and an editorial board member of American Archivist and Journal of Western Archives.


Speakers
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.


Friday March 31, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Lathrop 292 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

10:00am

Computer History Museum (Tour)
Explore the Computer History Museum's new exhibit, "Make Software Change the World." The Museum is located in Mountain View, about a 20 minute car ride from Stanford.

Show your PDA registration or attendee badge and receive 1/2 price admission at only $8.75.

There is a lot to see and do at the Museum. Docent-led tours and demonstrations occur on a daily basis, please visit the Museum's website, http://www.computerhistory.org/visit/  for exhibits and directions or call 650.810.1010 for the daily schedule.

Volunteers

Friday March 31, 2017 10:00am - 5:00pm
Computer History Museum 1401 N Shoreline Blvd, Mountain View, CA 94043

10:00am

Terraforming: Art and Engineering in the Sacramento Watershed (Self-guided Tour)

Embark on a self-guided tour of Stanford University Libraries' cross-disciplinary exhibition, Terraforming: Art and Engineering in the Sacramento Watershed.

The exhibition, co-curated by Laura Cassidy Rogers (PhD Candidate in Modern Thought and Literature, Stanford University) and Emily Grubert (PhD Candidate in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University), is on view in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda in the Green Library Bing Wing, from January 26 to April 30, 2017.

Terraforming: Art and Engineering in the Sacramento Watershed examines the history of freshwater in the Sacramento Watershed, juxtaposing materials from the archive of California artists Helen and Newton Harrison with materials from local, state, and national archives that document the development of water resources in California’s Central Valley and the West. Presented as discrete, parallel displays—with Art on one side of the gallery and Engineering on the other—the exhibition demonstrates that social and environmental consciousness has manifest in both professions, and that artists and engineers can work together to rethink and reimagine freshwater landscapes and ecology in a sustainable way.


Friday March 31, 2017 10:00am - 6:00pm
Munger Rotunda, 2nd Floor, Bing Wing, Green Library Cecil H. Green Library, 557 Escondido Mall, Stanford, CA 94305

11:00am

David Rumsey Map Center (Tour)
Registration is limited; in order to attend you must both register for PDA 2017 and also register for this tour via the conference registration page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/personal-digital-archiving-pda-2017-tickets-28669844276.

Join a guided tour of the David Rumsey Map Center!

The David Rumsey Map Center opened on April 19th, 2016 in the Bing Wing of Green Library, Stanford University.  The Center is a new collections-based resource designed to provide access to cartographic information in all of its forms, from paper to digital. It is a flexible and rich environment for research and teaching with large collection of rare atlases and maps, high-resolution screens equipped with interactive tools for viewing digital images, and knowledgeable staff.

In this collocated environment, scholars can work with original physical items side-by-side with digital surrogates. In digital form, a map can be readily manipulated, enlarged, quantified, aggregated, visualized, and systematically interrogated in a unique way. Working simultaneously with the native format and context (such as a map within an atlas) enriches the information available, giving researchers a chance to embark on discoveries that would otherwise not be possible.


The Rumsey Map Center, named for its leading donors, David and Abby Rumsey, complements Stanford Libraries’ long history of working with cartographic materials. The combined holdings include the David Rumsey Map Collection of some 150,000 maps and their digital surrogates as well as other cartographic collections and materials long held at Stanford, including the Glen McLaughlin Collection of maps of California as an Island, the Dr. Oscar I. Norwich Collection of Maps of Africa and over 10,000 antiquarian maps collected over the years by Special Collections.

Location

The entrance is located off of the Rotunda area in the Bing Wing of Green Library (second floor). Proceed through the door to the stairwell and up to the fourth floor entrance. 

If you are unable to join the tour, the DRMC is also accessible to visitors on Friday from 1-5 PM. 


Volunteers
DF

Deardra Fuzzell

Cartographic Technology Specialist, Stanford
Oversized Imaging, Rare Maps and the David Rumsey Map Center.
GS

G. Salim Mohammed

Head and Curator, David Rumsey Map Center, Stanford University Libraries

Friday March 31, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
David Rumsey Map Center Green Library, 557 Escondido Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-6064

1:00pm

Archiving and Preservation Tools and Techniques for Podcasters (Workshop)
Registration is limited; in order to attend you must both register for PDA 2017 and also register for this workshop via the conference registration page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/personal-digital-archiving-pda-2017-tickets-28669844276.

About the Workshop

AAre you a podcaster with a hard drive full of files? Have you considered how future historians, researchers, archivists, and audiophiles will find and listen to your work?
This hands-on workshop will demonstrate low-cost, easy-to-use storage and media asset management tools and techniques to ensure the longevity of your digital audio files. Since podcasting “best practices” have not yet been developed, this workshop also aims to publish a set of basic guidelines that can be re-purposed for future workshops, or be used by individuals or groups to archive a collection of audio files. Facilitators will guide participants through basic principles of audio file formats, metadata and checksum generation, and cloud vs. physical storage solutions. In addition to this, we will discuss advocacy techniques to promote and make unique content discoverable. The focus will be on low-cost, user-friendly tools. Participants will be encouraged to bring laptops, as well as their podcast audio files for a hands-on experience (with setup instructions provided prior to the workshop); however, laptops are not a requirement and participants may also follow along with the demos.
Although this workshop will be targeted towards podcasters and independent audio producers, it will be suitable, useful and fun for anyone working with a personal collection of digital audio files.

About the Presenters

Mary Kidd currently works at New York Public Library’s Special Collections Division, and was an NDSR resident at New York Public Radio.  She is also an active member of the XFR Collective. XFR is a non-profit organization that partners with artists, activists, individuals, and groups to lower the barriers to preserving at-risk audiovisual media.

Dana Gerber-Margie is an A/V and Digital Archivist for Recollection Wisconsin’s Listening to War: Uncovering Wisconsin’s Wartime Oral Historiesgrant project. She is also a founding member of the Bello Collective, a publication about podcasts, and routinely asks probing questions about producers’ digital preservation habits.

Anne Wootton is the co-founder of Pop Up Archive, a platform for making sound searchable. She holds a Master’s in Information Management and Systems from the University of California Berkeley. She is a winner of the 2012 Knight News Challenge: Data and has spoken internationally about audio search and discoverability, including SXSW Interactive, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the Aspen Institute.

Danielle Cordovez is the Audiovisual Librarian at the New York Public Library’s Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound.  She is currently serving on the Board of Directors of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) as well as the Steering Committee of the Society of American Archivists (SAA).


Speakers
avatar for Danielle Cordovez

Danielle Cordovez

Librarian, Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives for Recorded Sound
Danielle Cordovez is the Audiovisual Librarian at the New York Public Library’s Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound. She is currently serving on the Board of Directors of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) as well as the Steering Committee of the Society of American Archivists (SAA).
avatar for Dana Gerber-Margie

Dana Gerber-Margie

Dana Gerber-Margie is an A/V and Digital Archivist for Recollection Wisconsin’s Listening to War: Uncovering Wisconsin’s Wartime Oral Historiesgrant project. She is also a founding member of the Bello Collective, a publication about podcasts, and routinely asks probing questions about producers’ digital preservation habits.
avatar for Mary Kidd

Mary Kidd

Systems and Operations Coordinator, New York Public Library
Mary currently works at New York Public Library’s Special Collections Division as their Systems and Operations Coordinator. Prior to this, she was a National Digital Stewardship Resident at New York Public Radio. She is a member of the XFR Collective, a non-profit organization that partners with artists, activists, individuals, and groups to lower the barriers to preserving at-risk audiovisual media.
avatar for Anne Wootton

Anne Wootton

CEO, Pop Up Archive
Anne Wootton is the co-founder of Pop Up Archive, a platform for making sound searchable. She holds a Master’s in Information Management and Systems from the University of California Berkeley. She is a winner of the 2012 Knight News Challenge: Data and has spoken internationally about audio search and discoverability, including SXSW Interactive, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and the Aspen Institute.


Friday March 31, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Lathrop 296 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

1:00pm

Save your Photos (Workshop)
Registration is limited; in order to attend you must both register for PDA 2017 and also register for this workshop via the conference registration page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/personal-digital-archiving-pda-2017-tickets-28669844276.

About the Workshop

The goal of this workshop is to teach and interact with the local community to think about digital personal archive. To share ideas, techniques and easy conservation practices I have developed as professional photographer and photography archivist for families. It is important to start a conversation around quantity vs quality of image production, generate an understanding of pixels, a debate and a dialogue around the pros and cons of a 100% digital photographic archive, the costs and the priorities that need to be raised to define personal conservation practices. Questions and introduce simple ideas and techniques to seek for a longer preservation of the family history.

Main topics to be covered:

  1. Digital Image vs Analogue Images;
  2. Pixels, Cameras, Image Quality and Prints;
  3. Asset and Personal Archive Management;
  4. Back Up, Drives and Easy Safe techniques for digital storage;
  5. Analogue Storage;
  6. How to keep thinking about archives in the future.

About the Presenter

Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive that had been untouched for almost 20 years. That led her to pursue a strong photographic education at the International Center of Photography in New York, where she graduated in the general studies in photography and later became an Exhibition Coordinator and was a teaching assistant at the International Center of Photography to the classes: “What is an archive” taught by Claudia Sohrens, “Digital Seminar”  and “Images and Ideas” taught by Fred RItchin, one of the greatest mind in contemporary digital image making. I addition to that, she was chosen as an Emerging Immigrant Artist by the New York Foundation for the Arts, where through a competitive process she has been chosen to attend a free mentoring program for artists with social practices.

In 2016 an opportunity was presented to focus great part of her professional practices to archives. She started to help photographers and families to start thinking about their personal archives, both analog and digital. This work led to her current project on called “Saveit.Photo” where she tries to introduce the principles of personal  archive in the digital era to the general public. By spreading simplified archival techniques she aims to contribute to the conservation of photographs as they are, undoubtedly, an important element of the collective memory and family histories.


Speakers
avatar for Júlia Pontes

Júlia Pontes

Saveit.Photo
Júlia Pontés is a Brazilian/Argentinian photographer and personal photographic archive consultant currently living and working in NY. She holds Masters Degrees in Business from Sorbonne, Paris I and in Law and Economics - Public Policies from Universidad Torcuato di Tella, in Argentina. Photography didn’t become the main focus of her professional life until 2013, when, among other things, she inherited an important photographic analog archive... Read More →


Friday March 31, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Lathrop 294 Lathrop Library, Stanford University 518 Memorial Way Stanford, CA 94305

4:00pm

Personal Digital Archiving Hackathon

Have you ever wondered what will happen to all the data you will create over your lifetime?

Consider your email, social media data, websites, photos, videos, documents, and all of the other files and traces you create and interact with on an ongoing basis. Do you know how you will preserve the data, understand it, and use it in the future?

Join friends and fellow coders to create innovative solutions to the ongoing challenges facing individuals (including digital humanists and cultural heritage researchers) in the digital age, including how we can best analyze, visualize, and use the immense variety of personal data that we are all creating.

How can we best make sense of the digital strands and data that comprise a 21st century life?

Join your friends! Eat our food! Win our prizes! Keep the present safe for the future! Read about requirements, judges, prizes, and more at our Devpost page. 

Note: In order to participate in the Hackathon, you must register via Devpost as well as via Eventbrite by 4 PM on March 31.

Sponsors for this hackathon include Stanford University Libraries' Department of Special Collections and University ArchivesCenter for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR), and ePADD.

Moderators
PC

Peter Chan

Digital Archivist, Stanford University Libraries
Peter Chan is Digital Archivist at Stanford University. He is also Program Manager for ePADD.
SH

Sudheendra Hangal

Professor of Practice in Computer Science, Ashoka University
I am a researcher in the areas of social computing and human-computer interaction, and a Professor of Practice in Computer Science at Ashoka University, where I also co-direct the Trivedi Center for Political Data. Formerly, I was the Associate Director for the Stanford Mobisocial Lab. My research explores novel applications for the digital life-logs that millions of consumers are collecting. These applications are demonstrated... Read More →
avatar for Josh Schneider

Josh Schneider

Assistant University Archivist, Stanford University
Josh Schneider is Assistant University Archivist at Stanford University, and Community Manager for ePADD, an open-source software package that supports archival processes around the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives.
avatar for Glen Worthey

Glen Worthey

Digital Humanities Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
Glen Worthey has been Digital Humanities Librarian in the Stanford University Libraries since 1997, and co-leads the Libraries' new Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR). He hosted the international "Digital Humanities 2011" conference at Stanford, serves on the Steering Committee for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), and is a co-convener of the “DH in Libraries” Special Interest Group... Read More →

Friday March 31, 2017 4:00pm - Saturday April 1, 2017 5:00pm
Huang Engineering Center, Stanford University 475 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305, USA